Thanks for scaring

Lyric Opera Unlimited, the education and outreach program of Lyric Opera of Chicago, has done our fair city a great favor by producing Fellow Travelers, the new Gregory SpearsGreg Pierce opera commissioned by the Cincinnati Opera in 2016. I caught the last of four performances on Sunday afternoon in the beautiful, old 984-seat Athenaeum Theatre in Chicago. I found the performance intellectually and politically riveting, musically thrilling, and profoundly moving. It was a triumph.  Read more »

Why can’t a woman be more like a man?

“The background chorus characters in the Broadway show I saw tonight unobtrusively included a gay couple, and jaded though I sometimes am I think that’s really neat.” [@FeldmanAdam]

Purple hearts

“If I loved you, time and again I would try to say all I’d want you to know.”

The composer Gregory Spears is a unique example of this maxim: one must be “deeply rooted in tradition in order to innovate with integrity.”  Read more »

We’re here, we’re queer (well, some of us)

What the hell is Three Way doing on a list of 7 American Operas That Put LGBTQ Issues Center Stage?

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Cruise, control

Cincinnati Opera presented the world premiere Fellow Travelers Friday and I’m here to tell you that not only does the opera have legs, it has balls.

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Why we fight

“Over the years, I have often been asked why I feel my sexuality is anyone’s business and why I am so open about it in print.”

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Ott and proud

“Baritone Jarrett Ott (bottom) in Philadelphia, with current boyfriend Adam Franklin (top)…”

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Cold “Case”

First-time novelist Matthew Gallaway’s ardent love for Tristan and Isolde gushes through every page of The Metropolis Case. According to Gallaway, Tristan is the highest expression of human art, and the book functions effectively as the ultimate initiator in the cult of Wagner. The novel opens with a lengthy discussion of the opera in the format of an email from an opera lover to a less-enlightened friend, and characters are forever discussing the opera, saying things like “You don’t ‘check out’ Tristan. You become it.”

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A Noisy Place

Two versions, and it’s hard to say which one is more revolting, of one of the least savory moments in the life of Leonard Bernstein.

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Something unspoken

A brace of profiles in the March issue of Opera News engage the reader in a fascinating game of “the same, but different.” Simon Keenlyside and Paulo Szot are both baritones; both handsome, sexy men; and they’re both adept in classical and more modern musical theater forms. Both gentlemen are starring in new productions at the Met this spring, too. So… what is it that sets these two fellows apart? 

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