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  • La marquise de Merteuil: Il Trionfo di Camilla – I prefer the cray-cray of Cossotto… 2:49 PM
  • La Valkyrietta: Very good manou, but after I posted I had an epiphany and solved my puzzle. “If... 2:46 PM
  • Feldmarschallin: The actor Gottfried John died at the age of 72 of cancer. He was in many Fassbinder movies... 2:40 PM
  • Flora del Rio Grande: Kashie, if I may comment on your comment, the “new” Goerke is really the... 2:20 PM
  • manou: Fats Waller has a go (0.57) httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=rvZv Oblb6ec 2:18 PM
  • FragendeFrau82: I foresee a nightmare trying to get THOSE tickets… 2:17 PM
  • La Valkyrietta: manou, Yes, a danger. Anyway, originally on Broadway the lyrics went, “If she is... 1:23 PM
  • Grane: PS–congratul ations, Sanford! 1:14 PM
  • Grane: So did anyone hear Anna in Four Last Songs? I love her voice and her commitment, but I do think you... 1:14 PM
  • manou: Much as I enjoyed the return of the prodigal marshie, I am now worried because sleeping in all those... 1:07 PM

Kraus purposes

Perhaps there are not that many people in the world who would look at a CD cover and think “Oh, goody, goody! A libretto by Eugène Scribe I’ve never come across before!” Scribe, a prolific creator of many forms of popular theatre in Paris, wrote the libretti for the most famous French grand operas but also produced works in many other genres. I knew I could expect a lot of variety, incident and entertainment from Ali Baba ou Les Quarante voleurs (“Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”) and I was not disappointed. Read more »

Ladies in their sensitivities

This week, I was pleasantly surprised to find an envelope from La Cieca in my mailbox. Inside I found two contrasting CDs of soprano arias, one of Verdi and the other of Mozart. As someone who thinks Verdi is the greatest composer who ever lived and who feels pretty meh about Mozart, I expected to love the Verdi and be bored by the Mozart. I wasn’t far wrong.

The first CD is Krassimira Stoyanova singing Verdi arias. The program is as follows: Read more »

Where the boys are

When Norman Lebrecht is declaring on an almost daily basis that classical music is dead, it’s perhaps heartening that four of today’s prominent tenors have recently recorded what might be called fluff/vanity albums.

Joseph Calleja released an album of eclectic love songs, named (what else?) Amore. Hot on its heels is Vittorio Grigolo’s foray into an equally eclectic mix of religious songs, Ave Maria. On a slightly less fluffy level are Rolando Villazón’s album of Mozart concert arias, intriguingly entitled Mozart, and Juan Diego Flórez’s foray into the French spinto/heroic repertoire, named, naturellement, L’amour.   Read more »

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Sex please: we’re British

The finer performances of Tristan und Isolde have a way of sounding like a four-hour improvisation, the fruit of a single moment of inspiration that makes one forget how emotionally manipulative and painstakingly crafted the music really is.

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Farinelli from heaven

My impossible wish would be to hear one of the great castrati who dominated opera for most of the 18th century.

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Brass ring

Marek Janowski’s survey of Wagner operas on PentaTone so convincingly captures the pulse and dramatic flow of many of the works that the music-making at times sounds almost effortless.

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New faces

Mr. Ian Rosenblatt is a London solicitor and patron of charitable causes in Britain primarily focused on classical music.

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Habit, forming

I’ve always had a fondness for Giacomo Puccini’s Suor Angelica and apparently so did he since he often referred to it as, “among the finest of my children.”

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Meadow festival

Beneath the pageantry, the paeans to German art and the self-referential allusions to the creative process, Die Meistersinger is a story about a community and human qualities like love, friendship, envy and hatred.

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Le jazz tiède

The crossover album: a hint that that an artist has either exhausted all the repertory at her command and owes her record label a new release or that her waning vocal resources really shouldn’t be taxed much further than an octave.

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