Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • EarlyRomantic: Born on this day in 1955 soprano Cheryl Studer. Happy 59th birthday soprano Cheryl Studer.... 8:05 AM
  • Indiana Loiterer III: The “instrumentalizati on” of serious art is its subordination to a social or cultural... 8:04 AM
  • manou: http://tinyurl.com /nadutpo ? 7:44 AM
  • armerjacquino: Cocoa- dead right. Also, it takes a certain kind of toxic mindset to look at the way someone... 6:59 AM
  • manou: What if Saudi Arabia is your country, you are female, and you want to drive your car? 6:46 AM
  • Cicciabella: I think the use of the words “those foreigners” answers your question, Jamie01. 6:46 AM
  • Jamie01: As per armerjaquino above what if France is your country, and you want to wear the niqab? 6:43 AM
  • thenoctambulist: Yeah, just name calling something as “dumb” is proof of intellectual superiority... 6:28 AM
  • Often admonished: I think GU is pointing out that so far, and especially in Northern Europe, it’s been... 6:06 AM
  • La Cieca: This “right to privacy” is something of a slippery slope. The way the law is currently... 5:43 AM

Anger’s aweigh

It was a night a-tingle with excitement at the Metropolitan Opera House. At least part of this lay in never knowing when vocal protests might explode (verbally) somewhere in the auditorium. Read more »

Unadorned

There was wonder and magic Wednesday night in Philly when The Philadelphia Chamber Music Society presented British tenor Mark Padmore and American pianist Jonathan Biss in a recital devoted to the songs of Schumann, Tippett, and Fauré. Read more »

Martinu, very dry

Gotham Chamber Opera, which began to operate twelve years ago with a double bill of Bohuslav Martinu’s quirky little pieces, opened its 2014-15 season with two more, Alexandre bis (Alexander, twice) and Comedy on the Bridge. Both were composed in the 1930s, when Martinu, like any East European with artistic aspirations, was living in Paris. There, he became acquainted with the neo-classicism of Stravinsky, the modernism of Les Six, with surrealism and le jazz hot. His music is difficult to pigeonhole: quirky, light, individual. When war broke out, he absconded to America, which he enjoyed, but he returned to Europe before his death in 1959.  Read more »

Fetes_1

Myth opportunity

America hasn’t exactly been vigorous about commemorating the 250th anniversary of the death of Jean-Philippe Rameau.

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matthew_1

Black, box

Passion propels more operas than almost any other human emotion; however, many musical dramas have a very different sort of passion—the final days of Jesus—as their subject.

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Anthony Barrese

Sweet prince

The rediscovery of Franco Faccio’s Amleto, a curious score that last week, via Baltimore Concert Opera, received its first performances since 1871, reminds us just how tough an act Giuseppe Verdi was to follow.

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Iphigenia_amazon

No such Gluck

When Richard Wagner reached into the past and revised Gluck’s Iphigénie en Aulide, he went beyond the accepted boundaries of tinkering and more or less created a new work that’s fomented aesthetic debates ever since.

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ballo_san_francisco

Stockholm syndrome

The big news out of the Bay this week, of course, is that David Gockley, after ten years at the helm here and over forty in opera, has decided not to pull a Bloomberg/Galupe-Borszkh.

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Panning for gold

Giacomo Puccini’s horse-opera version of “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,”  La Fanciulla del West, based on David Belasco’s play, The Girl of the Golden West, enjoyed the status of a curate’s egg for quite a while.

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Ullrich

Nightingale

Readers of this site are typically up to speed on emerging vocal talents, so clearly there is no need for me to write a review of Chilean-German soprano Carolina Ullrich’s riveting recital at the Paris Opera?

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