Cher Public

  • kashania: Manou: Thank you for your review, which I read with interest. I’m glad you came back. It would’ve been... 12:44 PM
  • Batty Masetto: When I was at Oberlin, we did think of it as Midwest even though our cultural focus was more on New York than on Chicago... 12:38 PM
  • phoenix: Covington, KY – right across the river. It was a great airport years ago. - Now, for E- + those devout wikipedians amongst... 12:35 PM
  • Cicciabella: So Musetta is Mimi’s understudy. Who understudies Musetta? The mother of the child whining for toys in Act II? 12:02 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: First time I flew to Cinti, we landed in Kentucky! 11:59 AM
  • manou: http://www.roh.org .uk/people/ekateri na-bakanova 11:48 AM
  • Cicciabella: Yoncheva out of tonight’s ROH Traviata. Bakanova in. Who is Bakanova? 11:44 AM
  • phoenix: Thanks – glad you mentioned the lighting. - As for the chairs, they should be unmovable – operahouses must be fined... 11:42 AM

Warhorse

Three blocks from the opera house is a terrible time to realize there was homework. And yet, there I was at Larkin Street or so when I remembered that Two Women was based not only on a movie (or rather, on the same novel as that movie) but on one that is apparently beloved of Italians, featuring the most glamorous star of the Italian cinema. Indeed, in her interview with David J. Baker, Anna Caterina Antonacci goes so far as to say that every Italian of her generation has seen La Ciociara “at least three times.” Ah well, I thought. I’ll wing it.   Read more »

Married to the mobcap

I have an idea (soon to be angrily debunked in the comments section) that Le nozze di Figaro is rarely a source of unalloyed bliss to the chronic operagoer. Read more »

Mixed messages

“Geneticists use the term ‘hybrid vigor’ to describe the superiority of organisms that result from the breeding of vastly differing parents. For instance, the mule is more intelligent and more patient than its parents the horse and the donkey. When opera mixes genres, the results can be pretty vigorous, too—at least some of the time.” [New York Observer]

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Al fresco

Poor Paisiello. Out of the nearly 100 operas written by this industrious composer just one was generally regarded as a masterpiece.

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d’Arc victory

Tonight’s program at the New York Philharmonic, Arthur Honegger’s massive oratorio dramatique Jeanne d’Arc au Bûcher, has been an occasional visitor to the orchestra’s repertoire starting with the performance conducted by Charles Munch in January of 1948.

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“Less filling”

“Disciplined and intelligent.”

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Hymel Troyens

Fou fighter

It is easy to become overly identified with opera—as a cleverer friend of mine once noted: being a sports fan is an interest, but if you like opera, everyone thinks of it as a crippling obsession.

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Crown jewel

I’m a long-time fan of the Opera in English series funded by The Peter Moores Foundation that started, fittingly enough, with conductor Reginald Goodall’s performances of Wagner’s Ring cycle recorded live from the London Coliseum and released by EMI

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Haunted mountain

Beginning with the dark, ominous music of the prelude of Charles Wuorinen and Annie Proulx’s opera Brokeback Mountain, we know we are in for a very different and far less sentimental version of the work than was had with Ang Lee’s iconic 2005 film.

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Fidelio

I wake up screaming

Töt erst sein Weib!” shrieks Anja Kampe as Leonore during the very first moments of Andreas Homoki’s ingenious production of Beethoven’s only opera, Fidelio, at Opernhaus Zürich.

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