Harry Rose


The real king The real king

Bay Street Theater deserves enormous credit for transforming Camelot from a clumsy historical epic into a breezy, human fairytale about leaders who cannot lead.

on August 27, 2021 at 2:14 PM
Reorientation Reorientation

Concerts at Wolf Trap, mixed bags in more ways than one, provided fleeting glimpses of the old normal as moments of frisson mingled with more familiar monotony.

on August 18, 2021 at 8:37 AM
Sisters are doing it for themselves Sisters are doing it for themselves

Pauline Viardot‘s Cendrillon hews closer to the Perrault original than either Rossini or Massenet’s more familiar retellings and is dainty in conception as a salon opera for her students.

on July 21, 2021 at 11:25 AM
Damask and depth Damask and depth

For the weeks between the announcement that the return of Wolf Trap Opera would, in part, take the form of a concert performance of Sweeney Todd and its opening at the Filene Center on Friday evening, I racked my brain: why Sweeney now?

on July 07, 2021 at 12:10 PM
The expansive and the ostentatious The expansive and the ostentatious

Proudly and vividly on display was Anna Netrebko’s unique and glamorous ability to wear the music like a parade of couture gowns—some more sparkly than others, some a more flattering fit, but all thoughtfully chosen and laced into with care.

on February 07, 2021 at 8:00 AM
Recasting the mold Recasting the mold

Kennedy Center could not have predicted just how aptly Saturday evening’s rescheduled recital of 2020 Marian Anderson Award winner, baritone Will Liverman, would respond to the moment.

on November 10, 2020 at 3:57 PM
Day at the museum Day at the museum

Renée Fleming presented a satisfyingly eclectic and quietly daring program of songs and arias, an interesting timestamp on a career that, despite its crepuscular vibe, seems as active as ever.

on August 02, 2020 at 9:55 AM
Hymns and chaos Hymns and chaos

It’s Easter season, and that can mean only one thing for opera: It’s Cavalleria Rusticana time. And I, for one, couldn’t be more excited.

on April 14, 2020 at 12:46 PM
A talent to a muse A talent to a muse

The ballet I have grown to love, admire, and ponder the most is Stravinsky’s first collaboration with George Balanchine, Apollo.

on March 18, 2020 at 4:21 PM
Group therapy Group therapy

As long as women have been preyed upon, Don Giovanni has been relevant.

on March 10, 2020 at 1:31 PM
A new meadow to wander in A new meadow to wander in

Over the past two decades, the understatedly beguiling Sasha Cooke has inched chronologically inwards in her subtle conquest of swathes of mezzo concert repertoire.

on February 20, 2020 at 12:32 PM
General, not specific General, not specific

While Russell Thomas admirably goes toe to toe with Otello (and Otello) in a thoughtful and self-aware way, the assumption feels like a work in progress if not an outright mismatch with his vocal gifts.

on November 07, 2019 at 12:39 PM
Immersed in eternal light Immersed in eternal light

Christian Gerhaher delivers a Kindertotenlieder of such conciliatory tact that it erases all others.

on October 20, 2019 at 12:14 PM
“To be natural is such a very difficult pose to keep up” “To be natural is such a very difficult pose to keep up”

Tosca, as it exists now, can’t be real, spontaneous drama-it’s just Camp.

on June 03, 2019 at 9:00 AM
Turning over an old leaf Turning over an old leaf

Is there any opera that can take more of a beating while still making an impact than Eugene Onegin

on March 12, 2019 at 9:36 AM
Alzare le spalle Alzare le spalle

“Non mi dispiace” seemed to be the general consensus in the loggione December 7 when Verdi’s Attila came roaring into La Scala to open the 2018-19 season.

on December 16, 2018 at 2:09 PM
Sondheim sensibility: postmodernism Sondheim sensibility: postmodernism

In crafting his musicals, Sondheim’s focus, regardless of genre, tends towards the processive.

on December 13, 2018 at 9:00 AM
Sondheim sensibility: camp Sondheim sensibility: camp

The singularity of Stephen Sondheim contributes to the conception of him as a camp figure.

on December 12, 2018 at 10:00 AM
Dancer in the dark Dancer in the dark

Patrice Chéreau‘s Elektra brims with ideas beyond its eschewing of the opera’s standard, hysterical trappings.

on November 20, 2018 at 8:20 AM
Rock out with your Tracht out Rock out with your Tracht out

Lohengrin descended upon the Wiener Staatsoper this month like American college students to Oktoberfest: loudly, spastically, not especially coherent, and in full lederhosen and dirndls.

on November 14, 2018 at 7:48 AM
Santuzza in a kimono Santuzza in a kimono

The whole performance reminded me of what Butterfly as I have never known it, but often herad about it, can be.

on November 08, 2018 at 10:47 AM
Paris was burning Paris was burning

Logistically, a large-scale revival of the operas of Giacomo Meyerbeer is an unreasonable request, much less an expectation.

on November 06, 2018 at 10:10 AM
Dishonored in the breach Dishonored in the breach

Uneven operas, like Verdi’s Ernani, which just recently finished its Scala run, more often work as theatre on the micro level than the macro.

on October 27, 2018 at 11:48 AM
Original sin Original sin

This new production of the 1847 original version of Verdi’s first stab at Shakespeare features the extraordinary performances of Luca Salsi and Anna Pirozzi as the Thane of Cawdor and his merry wife.

on October 15, 2018 at 3:03 PM
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