Harry Rose

Harry Rose, based in Washington, DC, is a recent graduate of Georgetown University. Starting out blogging independently as Opera Teen in 2013, he holds the auspicious distinction of being the youngest writer to ever contribute to parterre box (at age 14) and has had the pleasure and challenge of writing for the rigorously discerning cher public since 2012. Increasingly niche hobbies and interests include opera, ballet, literature in translation, Decadent-era verse drama, and gatekeeping Camp.


Shoot your shot Shoot your shot

Director R.B. Schlather deftly walks a porous boundary, casting this primordial paroxysm of Germanness as a dialogue between its naïve and moralistic narrative with its outsized legacy.

on June 22, 2022 at 1:15 PM
Ring my bell Ring my bell

The monsoon outside was no match for the torrents of gorgeous, dramatic singing and playing that was unleashed inside George Washington University’s Lisner Hall Sunday afternoon when Washington Concert Opera, in a glorious deluge of Léo Delibes, presented Lakmé to round out its return season.

on May 24, 2022 at 10:00 AM
Room temperature Room temperature

It’s maybe not a surprise that Carmen is neither a good vocal nor temperamental fit for Isabel Leonard.

on May 18, 2022 at 12:41 PM
Incandescent like some adolescent Incandescent like some adolescent

She Loves Me can take a beating.

on April 15, 2022 at 4:09 PM
‘Così,’ cheap ‘n cheerful ‘Così,’ cheap ‘n cheerful

In 2022, making Così fan tutte intimate is not a radical act. Making it enjoyable, however, is.

on March 21, 2022 at 10:11 AM
Moving on Moving on

The Kennedy Center’s Opera House was a white-hot crucible of theatre kid energy on Friday evening for a luxurious 50 Years of Broadway at the Kennedy Center gala.

on February 17, 2022 at 8:58 AM
The second time around The second time around

While the formulaic nature of some of Rossini’s other operas can undermine his ability to balance bravura singing and playing with legitimate drama, a concert Maometto II proves, with what it offers as much as what it lacks, that the formula still works.

on November 24, 2021 at 9:32 AM
Open and clothes case Open and clothes case

From an exposure standpoint, Ruth Bader Ginsburg was the best thing to happen to opera since Beverly Sills.

on November 08, 2021 at 12:21 PM
The real king The real king

Bay Street Theater deserves enormous credit for transforming Camelot from a clumsy historical epic into a breezy, human fairytale about leaders who cannot lead.

on August 27, 2021 at 2:14 PM
Reorientation Reorientation

Concerts at Wolf Trap, mixed bags in more ways than one, provided fleeting glimpses of the old normal as moments of frisson mingled with more familiar monotony.

on August 18, 2021 at 8:37 AM
Sisters are doing it for themselves Sisters are doing it for themselves

Pauline Viardot‘s Cendrillon hews closer to the Perrault original than either Rossini or Massenet’s more familiar retellings and is dainty in conception as a salon opera for her students.

on July 21, 2021 at 11:25 AM
Damask and depth Damask and depth

For the weeks between the announcement that the return of Wolf Trap Opera would, in part, take the form of a concert performance of Sweeney Todd and its opening at the Filene Center on Friday evening, I racked my brain: why Sweeney now?

on July 07, 2021 at 12:10 PM
The expansive and the ostentatious The expansive and the ostentatious

Proudly and vividly on display was Anna Netrebko’s unique and glamorous ability to wear the music like a parade of couture gowns—some more sparkly than others, some a more flattering fit, but all thoughtfully chosen and laced into with care.

on February 07, 2021 at 8:00 AM
Recasting the mold Recasting the mold

Kennedy Center could not have predicted just how aptly Saturday evening’s rescheduled recital of 2020 Marian Anderson Award winner, baritone Will Liverman, would respond to the moment.

on November 10, 2020 at 3:57 PM
Day at the museum Day at the museum

Renée Fleming presented a satisfyingly eclectic and quietly daring program of songs and arias, an interesting timestamp on a career that, despite its crepuscular vibe, seems as active as ever.

on August 02, 2020 at 9:55 AM
Hymns and chaos Hymns and chaos

It’s Easter season, and that can mean only one thing for opera: It’s Cavalleria Rusticana time. And I, for one, couldn’t be more excited.

on April 14, 2020 at 12:46 PM
A talent to a muse A talent to a muse

The ballet I have grown to love, admire, and ponder the most is Stravinsky’s first collaboration with George Balanchine, Apollo.

on March 18, 2020 at 4:21 PM
Group therapy Group therapy

As long as women have been preyed upon, Don Giovanni has been relevant.

on March 10, 2020 at 1:31 PM
A new meadow to wander in A new meadow to wander in

Over the past two decades, the understatedly beguiling Sasha Cooke has inched chronologically inwards in her subtle conquest of swathes of mezzo concert repertoire.

on February 20, 2020 at 12:32 PM
General, not specific General, not specific

While Russell Thomas admirably goes toe to toe with Otello (and Otello) in a thoughtful and self-aware way, the assumption feels like a work in progress if not an outright mismatch with his vocal gifts.

on November 07, 2019 at 12:39 PM
Immersed in eternal light Immersed in eternal light

Christian Gerhaher delivers a Kindertotenlieder of such conciliatory tact that it erases all others.

on October 20, 2019 at 12:14 PM
“To be natural is such a very difficult pose to keep up” “To be natural is such a very difficult pose to keep up”

Tosca, as it exists now, can’t be real, spontaneous drama-it’s just Camp.

on June 03, 2019 at 9:00 AM
Turning over an old leaf Turning over an old leaf

Is there any opera that can take more of a beating while still making an impact than Eugene Onegin

on March 12, 2019 at 9:36 AM
Alzare le spalle Alzare le spalle

“Non mi dispiace” seemed to be the general consensus in the loggione December 7 when Verdi’s Attila came roaring into La Scala to open the 2018-19 season.

on December 16, 2018 at 2:09 PM
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