Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • MontyNostry: antikk is right about the Macbeth at Covent Garden – she looked rather glamorous, but so... 7:32 PM
  • antikitschychick: Lmaoooo now that is funny Pavel! I think she looks like a combination of Montsy and... 7:10 PM
  • antikitschychick: Quanto: I highly doubt that’s true given her busy schedule…may be a few years... 7:01 PM
  • MontyNostry: I’ve said this on here before – it’s a shame that an intelligent woman with... 6:54 PM
  • antikitschychick: Ivy, this is an interesting observation but I don’t necessarily agree because, while... 6:54 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Rumor has it that she will begin or is already involved in having a teaching career! 6:54 PM
  • pavel: I love her in this video! I just can’t stop thinking, however, how much she looks like a... 6:49 PM
  • MontyNostry: I saw Max Jota in a competition a few years ago (2011) and I thought he was genuinely talented,... 6:41 PM
  • Poison Ivy: Ok, I’ve done some digging on what’s available for Monastyrska and have found some... 6:37 PM
  • antikitschychick: Lmaooooooo this is too funny. I really like her but Verdi might be rolling around in his... 6:35 PM

Panning for gold

Giacomo Puccini’s horse-opera version of “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,”  La Fanciulla del West, based on David Belasco’s play, The Girl of the Golden West, enjoyed the status of a curate’s egg for quite a while. Its popularity dwindled after its initial, and wildly successful, premiere at the Metropolitan in 1910 starring Enrico Caruso, Emmy Destinn, and Pasquale Amato and conducted by Arturo Toscanini. Since it was the first new opera commissioned by the Met it generated a lot of excitement in the media and with the public. Critics mostly fell over themselves for the glories of the music, mise en scène (real horses on stage!), the singing and conducting.   Read more »

Nightingale

Readers of this site are typically up to speed on emerging vocal talents, so clearly there is no need for me to write a review of Chilean-German soprano Carolina Ullrich’s riveting recital at the Paris Opera? Oh wait—you haven’t heard of her?! Read more »

Ten thousand bedrooms

The Metropolitan Opera desperately needed a new production of Le nozze di Figaro. The old Jonathan Miller production in its last revival had degenerated into a freakshow. My most vivid memory is the fingernails-on-chalkboard Susanna Mojca Erdmann simpering on the apron of the stage as the libretto called for her to be frantically shuttling Cherubino out of the Countess’s window. It was pure filth.   Read more »

Barbiere

Barber on the verge of a nervous breakdown

It’s a place where the one thing you can expect is the unexpected. The place is… Philadelphia?

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Stella di Napoli

The lady’s a star

I just arrived back from Stella di Napoli’s.

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capriccio_amazon

When I have sung my songs

Soprano Renée Fleming is certainly making the role of the Countess in Richard Strauss’s final opera Capriccio the focus of her late-career years.

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alcina

About last night

For those who like their Handel loud, with no forfeit of baroque finesse, one promising solution is to make the hall smaller.

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Norma San Francisco

Running, jumping, or burning Gaul

Far be it from me to join the Schadenfreudian chorus of “Bye, Bye, Berti!” you may have been hearing in certain quarters, but the first thing I am duty-bound to report about San Francisco Opera’s Norma (of which three performances remain) is that they’ve hit the jackpot, coverwise.

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Ermonla Jaho

Three nights in Paris

“Oh to be young and going to Paris for the first time,” exclaimed an elderly gentleman who donned his best sweatervest for a concert at the Ottawa International Chamber Music Festival this past August.

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giovanni_macerata

Juan and two

I always think of Don Giovanni as half of the greatest opera ever written. Or, actually, about 2/3 of the greatest opera ever written.

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