Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Opera Teen: Also, I first saw this when PBS aired it that following summer, so it makes me think of the... 9:59 PM
  • Bluevicks: DeMille seems to have a talent for ”fascinating ” costumes doesn’t he? First,... 9:56 PM
  • Opera Teen: Nothing particularly substantial for me, but I am SO EXCITED for Cenerentola this week. It was... 9:54 PM
  • la vociaccia: Wonderful that he is being capitalized on! He’s such an enjoyable musician 9:26 PM
  • Krunoslav: “And Domingo is playing Athanael.” Will Michel Senechal be on hand to play... 8:59 PM
  • laddie: The right way to celebrate Ishtar: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=OLNf snwn4n0 8:44 PM
  • Rowna: Thank you everyone for the nice words you had about my clip with a trill. I specialize in Hebrew and... 8:35 PM
  • antikitschychick: she looks lovely and OMG that black n gold dress is fabulous!! 8:21 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: I was gawking through operabase and saw that Machaidze is singing Thais next month... 8:05 PM
  • antikitschychick: OMG Rowna that was lovely!! Kudos to you and thanks for sharing :-D. 8:05 PM

No business like snow business

Pytor Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin is his masterwork and its themes of social convention and unrequited longing surely struck a deep chord in a composer who, in late 19th century Russia, was gay and had to conduct himself carefully.

I’d like to say a brief requiem for the Metropolitan Opera’s last production, brilliantly designed by Michael Levine and directed by Robert Carsen. Its strong use of color and abstraction brought an easy focus to the unabashed romanticism and melancholy of this work.  Read more »

The cup runneth over

Even after more than 30 years as a die-hard opera fan there are still parts of the repertoire I haven’t embraced. Benjamin Britten and myself are really only acquaintances and I’ve met Alban Berg but fear we shall never be friends. I really became an opera fan chronologically backwards starting with Puccini and ending, essentially, with Mozart and Handel. Only then came Wagner.

After distilling all those different musical styles and traditions, Wagner wasn’t really that difficult to wrap my head around, with the exception of Parsifal. I would check the score out from the library and follow along dutifully to the broadcasts waiting for the penny to drop. It was years before I finally understood the lengths of its constructive elements and how broad the expanses of melody and leitmotif were within that structure.   Read more »

New faces

Mr. Ian Rosenblatt is a London solicitor and patron of charitable causes in Britain primarily focused on classical music. In 1999 he stepped in to fund a concert by José Cura and the Philharmonia Orchestra when the sponsor withdrew at the last moment. Since then his foundation, Rosenblatt Recitals, has underwritten over 130 concerts with an eye on rising stars who haven’t been presented in London as yet.   Read more »

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Habit, forming

I’ve always had a fondness for Giacomo Puccini’s Suor Angelica and apparently so did he since he often referred to it as, “among the finest of my children.”

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Le jazz tiède

The crossover album: a hint that that an artist has either exhausted all the repertory at her command and owes her record label a new release or that her waning vocal resources really shouldn’t be taxed much further than an octave.

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Bowled over

I never thought I’d see the day when Giuseppe Verdi and Benjamin Britten would battle it out for musical superiority but that’s exactly what happened in Los Angeles this year.

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Pick your poison

I think we’re all aware by now of the wicked libel that the French dramatist Victor Hugo concocted about the fair Lucrezia Borgia with his depiction of her as a murderous virago.

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Show business

Now that many of us are leaping to the altar unfettered by those pesky legalities of yore the problem of what to put on the bridal (or groomal) registry has become an atrocious head scratcher.  So many of us have had housekeeping set up for so long now that we really don’t want for anything. Leave it to Prince Joseph Adam of Schwarzenburg, Duke of Krumlov to choose a most inspired present to give to his son upon his wedding in 1768; an opera.  Commissioned for the occasion from Giuseppe Scarlatti, who history posits was nephew to either the more [...]

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Drama queen

Say what you will about Naxos, but this company has created a sizeable number of recordings of works on the periphery of the standard repertory and have managed to document quite a few interesting singers in the bargain-and at bargain prices.

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Shadows on the silver screen

Strange as it is to encounter two such disparate works presented with the identical production concept, it’s odder still that the opera you’d think would be the slam dunk is anything but.

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