Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • NPW-Paris: Every time I look back at what I wrote at the time, I find it almmost useless. I heard Hymel only... 6:52 PM
  • manou: Costello interviews Keenlyside http://stephencost ellotenor.com/cate gory/blog/ 6:52 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: It’s not transposed, I recorded it and just checked on the piano. 6:27 PM
  • Cicciabella: Dear PUM, I was, of course, being sarcastic about the poppies, which look magnificent and... 6:24 PM
  • operaassport: I thought it sounded transposed as well but whether or not that happened what I did think was... 6:22 PM
  • PushedUpMezzo: Well all those artistic poppies in the Tower of London moat were pre-sold to donors to the... 6:01 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Yes, good diction is very important! httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=nIwr gAnx6Q8 5:56 PM
  • PushedUpMezzo: Oh for a lean pointed middle! Let alone laid out. 5:50 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: What interview? httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=xNz- O5ksg3o 5:49 PM
  • PushedUpMezzo: I liked that a lot, and, probably just as important, so did the increasingly mellow Ms Norman.... 5:47 PM

Feline AIDS continues unabated

“[J]udging singers in their 20s is truly difficult, especially with so much at stake for the finalists, including a $15,000 cash prize for each winner. Comparably gifted pianists in their 20s are much more likely to be technically assured and finished performers. Operatic voices, though, need long nurturing. Most young singers are still working out elements of their technique. Inevitably, the judges for these auditions are assessing the potential of the finalists as much as their actual performances. Moreover, as was made clear by the documentary film ‘The Audition,’ which followed the last round of the 2007 competition, performing in this concert could not be more high-pressure.” [Need You Ask?]

Oh my God, Opera, you look amazing!

Lady Jane Grey“A cover article this weekend about choosing the Top 10 classical composers misstates, at one point, the length of time that opera had existed as of 1750, when Bach died. As the article correctly conveys in other references, opera had been around for roughly 150 years then, not ‘a half-century’.” La Cieca is sure the article’s author, Anthony Tommasini, 162, regrets the error. [NYT]

La marguerite a fermé sa corolle

alagna_keenlyside“…whenever he was joined by the baritone Simon Keenlyside, who sang Rodrigo, the Marquis of Posa and Carlo’s devoted friend, Mr. Alagna opened up in every way.”

Well, wouldn’t you? [NYT]

Read more »

In the beginning

“Enrolled at the Manhattan School of Music, Mr. Jovanovich also began taking paying jobs around town. His first mention in The New York Times came in a 1996 review of the New York Gilbert and Sullivan Players in The Gondoliers at Symphony Space. Anthony Tommasini noted Mr. Jovanovich’s bright voice and strapping physique…” [NYT]

Read more »

Read more »

What happens in San Francisco stays in San Francisco

“It is in the Wagner repertory that Ms. Brewer has truly frustrated her fans. She has sung Isolde magnificently, though so far only in the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s ‘Tristan Project,’ which used Bill Viola’s videos, while Ms. Brewer and the other lead singers performed as in a concert, with music stands and vocal scores.” [NYT]

Read more »

Read more »

Together wherever we go

La Cieca must say that, for a chick, Katharina Wagner sure doesn’t talk much. But perhaps her reticence is something of a blessing, since it prevents her from spouting such facile generalizations as “…’Die Meistersinger,’ Hitler’s favorite Wagner opera.”  

Read more »

Read more »

Spinning chorus

“Her gal-pal friends play with what look like the tails of exotic serpents and keep huge spiders as pets. I was not exactly sure what this all meant. Still, the kids squealed with delight.” No more delighted than La Cieca was when she realized that Katharina Wagner has finally caught up to Mary Zimmerman in the use of oversized arachnidae in operatic Regie! [NY Times]

Read more »

Read more »

Hingegeben war ich stumm

“A tousle-haired and radiant young man called Ein Gast… appears” [NY Times]

Read more »

Read more »

Who criticizes the critics?

See, La Cieca thinks Brian Kellow is asking for trouble when, in the second paragraph of his analysis of last March’s Slatkinshchina, he admits, “I did not attend the March 29 opening-night performance of La Traviata, nor did I listen to it on Sirius Radio.”  

Read more »

Read more »

Need you ask? Need you tell?

“Exciting! Indomitable! Alluring! Rigid! Enormous! Pulsing! Penetrating! Riveting! The public shame of being flogged! Aching tenderness!” [NYT]

Read more »