Cher Public

  • gustave of montreal: Thibaudet also performed at the Met in Fedora as the exiled Polish pianist Lazinski. 9:01 PM
  • PCally: Adrianne Pieczonka 8:53 PM
  • NPW-Paris: Exactly where I’ll hear Sweeney Todd this Sunday. 7:24 PM
  • NPW-Paris: I heard it in a hot tent in Brussels with noisy ventilators and jet planes overhead, on their way to land. 7:01 PM
  • Operngasse: I first saw Much Ado in the Joseph Papp 1972 production with Sam Waterston and Kathleen Widows. Updated to early 20th century... 6:55 PM
  • NPW-Paris: Ayayay… grateful. 6:34 PM
  • NPW-Paris: I heard him in Rigoletto in Paris and agree with you: I was greatful for his generosity and risk-taking. 6:32 PM
  • quibbleglib: I’ve only seen him live once — in the Met Boheme — but in my experience, Fabiano is praised here because... 6:30 PM

Bea in the bonnet

Everyone who revives Bellini’s Beatrice di Tenda, as the Collegiate Chorale did at Carnegie Hall on Wednesday night, calls the piece an “overlooked masterpiece.” It has certainly been overlooked, while Norma, Sonnambula and Puritani go from strength to strength. Beatrice has not been staged in New York in living memory, and this was only its fourth concert performance here (third at Carnegie) in the last hundred years.   Read more »

The Beatrice generation

Beatrice di Tenda was a problem child, Vincenzo Bellini an alternately protective and disparaging parent. If he had lived to write another dozen operas this might not matter, but this work of 1833 was his penultimate piece; two and a half years later, the young Sicilian was dead, not yet 34.

The melodies of Beatrice thus come from the same rare and gorgeous fount as do those of Norma and Puritani, and if you love her sisters, you should certainly save a date for Beatrice. Her next big date in this neck of the woods comes tomorrow night, when the Collegiate Chorale and the American Symphony Orchestra present the opera at Carnegie Hall. Read more »