Cher Public

La Cieca

James Jorden (who writes under the names “La Cieca” and “Our Own JJ”) is the founder and editor of parterre box. During his 20 year career as an opera critic he has written for the New York Times, Opera, Gay City News, Opera Now, Musical America and the New York Post. He has also raised his voice in punditry on National Public Radio. From time to time he has directed opera, including three unsuccessful productions of Don Giovanni, a work he hopes to return to someday. He is the co-creator, writer and occasional wig stylist for “The Dozen Divas,” the long-running cabaret show starring the ineffable Dorothy Bishop. Currently he alternates his doyenne duties with writing a twice-weekly column on opera for the New York Observer.



Say yes to the dress

Gather, cher public, for discussion of today’s broadcast and HD of Eugene Onegin, live from the Met at 1:00 PM.  Read more »

Broadcast: Aida

Today’s broadcast of Aida from the Met begins at 12:30 PM, as does the traditional chat.

Charfreitagzauber

parterre box revives a classic Good Friday tradition.   Read more »

“Nicht heut, nicht morgen!”

But enough about Renée Fleming‘s farewell.

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Mai Tosca alla scena meno tragica fu

The Met promises eight months from now a new production of Tosca and insiders are already betting that Kristine Opolais as the titular Roman diva may well be replaced before opening night.

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Now and for always

Happy 84th birthday soprano Montserrat Caballé.

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L’ambigua

All right, so Renée Fleming says she’s not retiring from opera at the moment, and who should know better than she herself?

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Broadcast: Tristan und Isolde

This afternoon at the civilized hour of 1:00 PM, the Met will broadcast a performance of Tristan und Isolde recorded in the fall.

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A word from our sponsor

La Cieca and everyone else at parterre.com (not pictured) salute the advertisers who help bring opera news, gossip and reviews to you every day.

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But I’m a jeer leader

The Royal Opera’s Sir Antonio Pappano considers the question of booing at the opera.

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