Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Viva Sheila Nadler! 2:54 AM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=Vc5e qmucGl4 httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=8... 2:51 AM
  • SF Guy: Typo alert–I̵ 7;ve made no attempt to smooth out Anna’s charmingly fractured English,... 2:47 AM
  • mb: I suggest you re-check your dictionary. https://de.wikiped ia.org/wiki/Meiste rsinger &... 2:44 AM
  • La Cieca: What better place for a performance of gravitas than Boston? 2:38 AM
  • verliebtenmadeleine: DAMN, I wish I was in New York to see this. Fuck you, Abraham Foxman! 2:07 AM
  • SF Guy: I have a bootleg dvd of the complete original telecast as shown in theaters (including technical... 1:56 AM
  • m. croche: Bring a ham sandwich, perhaps. 1:55 AM
  • ilpenedelmiocor: And can someone please explain to me why the Met uses the spelling “Meisters... 1:27 AM
  • ilpenedelmiocor: How come Rudy Giuliani isn’t protesting my right of free speech to listen to artistic... 1:23 AM

The Met: What is to be done?

Coming as Peter Gelb did from the music industry, opera lovers hoped that he would display a more distinctive knack for casting and an improved talent pipeline than Joe Volpe offered during the waning years of his tenure.   Read more »

Glass, Gandhi, Occupy: Action

As suggested in Part I of this piece, to experience Glass’s Satyagraha as a purely aesthetic experience is unfortunately to succumb to a romantic ideology promoting detached reflection on art which is wholly inapplicable to such a politically-charged opera. The idea that Gandhi’s action-oriented philosophy would be packaged and sold for the sake of passive introspection would have bothered him deeply. Read more »

Glass, Gandhi, Occupy: Performance

That Philip Glass’s opera about Gandhi’s nonviolent civil disobedience should be revived by the Metropolitan Opera in 2011—a year marked by nonviolent revolutions and uprisings around the globe—is timely, to say the least. The most recent production of his Satyagraha (1979) was first premiered by the Met in the spring of 2008 as America stood on the precipice of the most devastating economic crisis in three-quarters of a century. Read more »

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Devil’s playground

UPDATE: Blogger Out West Arts reflects on the “Occupy Wall Street” incident at the Met’s Faust last night, noting that the shouts (and various responses from members of the audience) did not interrupt the music.

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Scenes from an occupation

There were rumors all day in the usual places, on the search string: Philip Glass, Lincoln Center, OWS.  The opera, though hypnotic, passed quickly, and Glass took a curtain call, got a hero’s welcome. Well, we thought, he can’t be both places at once.

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Lockdown

UPDATE: Philip Glass emerged from the Met tonight to read to the General Assembly (via mic check) the final lines from Satyagraha: “When righteousness/ Withers away/ And evil / Rules the Land /We come into being /Age after age/ And take visible shape /And move / A man among men/ For the protection/ Of good /Thrusting back evil /And setting virtue/ On her seat again.” Video of this speech (via The Rest is Noise) after the jump.

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Glass works

Composer Philip Glass will appear this evening in support of Occupy Museums in Lincoln Center plaza during the Met’s final performance this season of his Satyagraha. The demonstration is described by Occupy Museums as “an open conversation at 10:30 pm about the effects of increased privatization and corporatization of all aspects of society, and the use of nonviolent civil disobedience around the world to reclaim the commons.”

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Truth, force

Critic Ann Binlot draws some perhaps rather obvious parallels between Satyagraha and the Occupy Wall Street movement in a brief feature on ARTINFO.

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