Cher Public

Broadcast: Adriana Lecouvreur

The broadcast debuts of Anna Netrebko‘s Adriana and Piotr Beczala‘s Maurizio highlight a live broadcast from Vienna starting at 12:30 PM ET, and La Cieca is sure the cher public will have plenty to say.

  • Camille

    Oddio! I have a Thaïs hangover! But this is unMISSable!

    Looks to be a “traditional” production from the costume and Nebby looks wonderful here.

    Where is the coffee???!

    • PCally

      I think it’s the Mcvicar from the roh, so yes it’s mostly traditional (one of those theatre within theatre concepts are part of it but in a mostly unobtrusive way).

      This is one of the most beautiful photos of Netrebko I’ve ever seen

      • Camille

        That is well and good, as I’ve seen bits of this production and happen to like it a lot.

        I just cannot express my gratitude to you for having brought up that entire discourse on Lucio Silla. It’s just one of those works I’ve put off knowing for forever, and now I wish I’d always known of it. Also, for making me stop to consider Cuberli’s really excellent singing. I absolutely cannot listen to Sutherland as Semiramide, as she would spoil it and Cuberli is an excellent antidote, for I must now start in listening to acquaint myself for the big event in the spring.

        • PCally

          Your very welcome Camille. It’s the very least I can do since I myself am a relative newcomer to opera, specially the earlier mozart to opera, and for the most part have learned as much as a have from the writers and commentators here at parterre, including yourself.

          Cuberli was a singer I’d hear on the Barenboim mozart recordings and had liked without thinking she was anything special. It was only VERY recently that I’d heard her live stuff that I really began to love her (definitely a big fan at this point, even if some limitations become more apparent the more I listen. But what singer doesn’t have those?). The clips from her 1980s semiramides are really lovely, if not spectacular or flashy in the Sutherland mode.

          • Camille

            ‘But what singer doesn’t have those’,
            INDEED!

            Yes, it’s a balancing act, isn’t it? And one performance may go very well and then another -- not. It’s very hard for them in today’s overexposed Youtubing world, as there is no place to make a mistake or to hide, while learning. I feel a lot of empathy for these young singers as they have so much pressure put upon them to be perfect, right from the start. And no one is perfect!

            Yes, but Sutherland is too perfect, and I find after listening to her it’s impossible to tolerate mere human beings singing. There’s the rub!

            • gryphone

              I recently went back to Sutherland’s first Decca/London recording, The Art of the Prima Donna, and was astonished at what a finished musician, technician, and artist she was at that early age.

            • quoth the maven

              Not entirely “early.” Sutherland was well into her 30s at that point. She had made her Covent Garden debut eight years before. During her early years there, she was something of a utility singer--famously, Clotilde in Norma and the Priestess in Aida, both with Callas. It wasn’t until 1959 that she had her breakout success with Lucia, and by that time she truly was fully formed.

            • Camille

              By the time she made that recording she was around about 33-35 years old, had been singing at Covent Garden in a variety of roles, (and not just supporting ones either as there was Agathe and Amelia and the Hoffman girl(s) and Gilda and Eva in Meistersinger even!)— since the early fifties.

              She had started out as a little girl, singing her mother’s vocalises (her mother Muriel was a talented but non-professional mezzo), and had studied since a teenager. So you see, she was not at all a recent post grad who had discovered opera suddenly in their sophomore year and decided to make a go of it! Further, she lived with and married a very talented and able pianist, Richard Bonynge, who ceaselessly badgered her to practise and gradually lifted (and covertly as she lacked the gift of absolute pitch) her voice upward from its original placement as rather mezzo/dramatic soprano, and caused by Mama’s vocalise book -- into the supernatural and supernal realms above the staff, and of which all of us devotés know only too well.

              And yes, “The Art of the Prima Donna” is an astonishing, an astounding and award-winning recording. In its day it was considered de rigueur, but perhaps many now are not acquainted with it now? For me, it was essential instruction in what good singing consists of, and will be forever grateful to it for its manifold joys. Even for “The soldier tir’d”, even that!. Dame Joan was a phenomenal singer and a unique one. May her recordings be played for as long as humanity may go on.

          • quoth the maven

            I’m not sure whether this has already been mentioned, but if you’re a Cuberli fan, check her out in the “hat” aria from Il Viaggio a Reims. Delightful!

        • Susan Brodie

          What thread is the Lucio Silla conversation?

          • Camille

            Oh,
            Ms Brodie, it got started on this past Thursday’s Trove thread entitled “Over the garden wall”, with a recording of La finta giardiniera.

            Mr Corwin has also put in a link to a former transmission of Lucio Silla which was posted over a year ago and features a much younger Edita Gruberova. Sure to be outstanding.

            • Susan Brodie

              Thank you so much, Camille! I’m seeing the opera on Wednesday, so perhaps I can listen or download before then.

            • Camille

              Well, one can hardly be steered in the wrong direction by Mr Corwin as he has an excellent ear, not to mention bon goût, so I am hoping it will help you out.

  • Yige Li

    To access libretto:
    Italian and German: http://www.opera-guide.ch/opera.php?id=101 (Click on “Libretto” tab, then choose “D” or “I” for German or Italian libretto.)
    Italian and English: http://www.dynamiclassic.it/area_pubblica/booklets/CDS628-%20Libretto.pdf
    Italian and Spanish: http://kareol.es/obras/adriana/acto1.htm

    (And a shameless promotion for our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/lasplendidanetrebko/)

  • z. barf

    I didn’t listen to Thais yesterday, but this is a must.

  • Ivy Lin

    Here we go …

    • Southern Gal

      ugh for windows.. had to reboot and missed the first fifteen
      minutes… damnation

      • Camille

        Me too. My sympathies!
        Google Chrome is good.

  • manou

    Here is the irresistible chat up line -- “you look like my Mum and you are as beautiful as my flag”

    • Brackweaver

      Men have married for less!

    • Camille

      Hahahaha! You caught that one! I Have always wondered about Maurizio Conte di Sassonia!!

      • manou

        Not exactly what you would call an upright sort of character

        • Camille

          No, infatti, he wasn’t at all with the ladies but if he liked Mum and the flag,
          Well…couldn’t be all bad.

          • manou

            Well -- Trump likes his Mum and the flag…

            • Camille

              That disproves my theory then!!!

              He is always going over to Scotland for golf, and I hear they want NOTHING to do with him!

            • manou

              Trump was playing golf in Japan -- premier Shinzo Abe took a tumble and Trump carried on playing…

            • Camille

              Quel Boob! Or Rube!

            • manou

              Cafone

            • Camille

              Esatto!! Grazie, Signora!

            • manou
            • Donna Annina

              Manou, did you see the picture of him and his wife attending the Chinese opera? Priceless….

            • manou

              No -- will look it up. Very glad they were subjected to Chinese Opera….

            • Donna Annina
            • manou

              Thanks! One of the pictures could be of the Serban Turandot.

            • Camille

              Whenever I have a bad hair day from now on I’ll remember that picture of Der Drumpf boarding Air Force One, and cheer right up! Feeding koi looks to be a good occupational therapy to me.

            • manou

              Being fed to piranhas is better

            • Camille

              No such luck for us poor suckers here negli Stati Uniti!

              At least we got our votes counted for our mayor this week. No electoral college to muck up our luck!

            • NineDragonSpot

              Ouch. Have some pity for the poor Beijing opera performers who looked out from the stage and saw the flourescent ape. At least they probably didn’t understand a single demented word he said.

            • manou

              Dearest Nine Dragon! Please excuse my ill advised and flippant comment -- but may I say how glad I am to see you commenting here again. Maybe my lack of manners has an upside after all…

            • NineDragonSpot

              Heya, Manou -- long time no “see”! Too busy with the Chinese operas right now (ever see three, 3-hour operas in a single day? Outside? In 45-degree weather?) to listen to the latest broadcasts, but perhaps after the new year.

            • manou

              Nine hours of Chinese opera in blazing heat? So glad to see that you are hale and hearty. Not to mention in the pink, which I am told symbolizes sophistication, and cool-headedness.

  • Brackweaver

    I haven’t listened to this opera in a while. It’s rather comforting if that makes any sense.

    • Ivy Lin

      I think of this as “pizza opera.” If that makes sense.

  • Camille

    It’s comforting to me too Brackweaver as this is one of my oldest loves. It’s like home, mom, apple pie and Maurizio’s “la bandiera”!

  • Camille

    Michonnet didn’t make much of his Monologo. We will luckily have Ambrogio Maestri here at the Met! Hooray for that.

    • manou

      We had Corbelli as Michonnet -- not obvious casting but he was very touching

      • Camille

        He’s still singing? He is getting up there in age, isn’t he? Well, doesn’t matter with Michonnet anyway.

        • manou

          His personality makes up for any weaknesses in his voice

          • Camille

            Yes, in such a role that is all important.

  • Susan Brodie

    I saw this production a couple of years ago in Paris with…Gheorghiu. From the 9th row I could barely hear her, except when she doled out a money note. It’s so nice to hear a healthy-sounding Adriana.

    • Camille

      Was that at the Bastille or Garnier?

      Yes, similar problems from mid-orchestra here at Met. And so It goes.

      • Susan Brodie

        Bastille, with its bizarre acoustics. 9th row isn’t exactly mid-orchestra; the voices have more presence than around row 26, but hers was a pretty slender thread even up close. Will hear Falstaff there next week but from second balcony. Friends swear by the superior sound upstairs.

        • Camille

          Oh, that is interesting about the balcony. Sometimes, at certain places in the orchestra the sound is widely variable here. It’s very tricky. Upstairs here is also good as the sound seems to bounce up rather than out, but I am not happy with the Met acoustic as it sounds so manufactured to my ear. Something faux about it all!

          I was thinking about the Bastille acoustic recently while listening to Don Carlo — but it was impossible to really discern anything because of all the mics for the video/transmission,
          So moot point.

          • gryphone

            Camille, what you think about the acoustics of Dorothy Chandler Pavilion? I think it’s dreadful. And while we’re on the subject of Mrs. C., it was long said that Los Angeles did not have an opera company because Dotty didn’t like opera. When asked about that, she said, “Why, of course I like opera. Just last week we went to Convent Garden.”

            • Camille

              Dear gryphone—
              What can I say about Mrs Chandler’s vaunted pavilion?

              When I started going to it I was too young to know any better so I have fondest memories of the place for a variety of musical experiences which were extremely exciting to me. My first Wagnerian concert, my first Mahler symphony, Carlo Maria Giulini, the sacred musical prophet of Verdian opera, and the list goes on and on. I fell in love there as well. So, I have no idea of the acoustic with my. Iased enchantment of the place, and further, it has now been ten years since I last attended anything there, either Jenufa or Fidelio.

              So far as the story on Dorothy Buffum Chandler — well, that WAS the story, that “Buffy” did NOT want opera at her pavilion and only wanted Zubin (didn’t we all?). Once, and I have racked my brain to recall and come up with zero, but— I did speak to someone truly in the know about the situation. All I can now recall is that this person was even more emphatic about it all than the stories I’d always heard. Now, Buffy Chandler did do us the goodness of allowing the New York City Opera appearances for a good fifteen+ years, and for that we were all deeply and humbly appreciative. So—maybe we got the best of the bargain after all?

              I do really like the new Frank Gehry Disney Hall, on the site of an old parking lot where I once left my old rattletrap of a car while attending at Buffy’s pavilion. Gehry’s proud winged fantasies are somehow appropriate to Bunker Hill and somewhat reproachful of doughty old Dotty, now in her dotage and requiring some Botox around the edges, just as some of us old attendees. Frank’s acoustic is warm and I have enjoyed listening to my beloved Maestro Mehta there in Bruckner (something which I treasure and shall carry with me beyond the grave) but nothing will dispell the thrill of the young Zubie Baby (as us gurl groupies called him) conjuring up Mahler’s glorious Titan in Buffy’s buffet hall. It was a thrill, and acoustic be damned.

    • manou

      I saw her (and heard her) in the original production here at Covent Garden (with Kaufmann) and she was splendid. Someone on Forum Opera saw both and preferred Gheorghiu…

    • Ivy Lin

      Hmm I’ve heard Gheorghiu at the big unforgiving barn at the Met and also at Carnegie Hall and while I had some issues with some stylistic choices she made I never had a problem hearing her.

  • I’m listening to a very good performance through a barrage of drop-outs — anyone else experiencing this?

    • manou

      Yes!

    • Camille

      Yes, Will, terrible time with Safari and tried Opera as well, but Google Chrome is working fine without dropouts at all.

    • DellaCasaFan

      I don’t have any transmission problems on iTunes. Here’s the link: http://mp3stream3.apasf.apa.at:8000/

    • Yige Li

      At least there will be replay for 7 days on oe1. And there must be people recording it.

      • Camille

        Die Heilige Jungfer Marianne, for one

    • Ivy Lin

      VK records all. It will show up on vk maybe tomorrow at the latest.

      • cielo e mar

        And VK would be …?

        • Ivy Lin

          The Russian version of facebook, which also has the most diligent uploaders of all livestreams and radio transmissions. All the Met in HD casts show up like two days later in 1080p. It’s awesome.

          • cielo e mar

            Grazie! I’ll search.

    • Southern Gal

      TUNEIN is available for computers as well. however often the station’s website player is very good. this one is.

  • Camille

    Such a great entrance for mezzosoprano--but must knock it cold right away. Hmm, this one seems to lack a bit the temperament….very good G there. Sounds rushed by conductor. Isn’t grabbing me. We get Anita Rachvelishvili, I think?

    • Yige Li

      Yes, Anita.

  • Camille

    Love Beczala. Here comes the big Corelli messa di voce moment!

    • suzyQ

      I love Beczala & Netrebko -- hope they perform this opera at the Met!

      • Camille

        Oh hello suzy! Yes, they most certainly are going to sing this and open the season, in fact, and it will be either 2018 or ’19, according to The Oracle of Met Wiki Futures.

  • Donna Annina

    Just tuned in. How was Act I?

    • Camille

      Sounds like a pretty good dress rehearsal, frankly speaking and just entre nous deux!

      • Donna Annina

        Bien entendu--et merci!

  • Camille

    Here comes the hellcat fight. Remember Borodina and Guleghina being so palsy-walsy at the curtain of this act! Haha!

  • cielo e mar

    Netrebko almost sounds more mezzo than the Principessa.

    • Camille

      Well it’s got the same bleeding tessitura as la Principessa! Little worried it will tug down her top, or create a wave in the voice. That’s why soprani sing it at the end and why this and Fedora are known as “the graveyard of sopranos” In Italy.

      Who is conducting? This sounds very, um, unitaliano. Well, it is, so what did I expect?

      Oh, it’s PIDO! That explains it.

  • cielo e mar

    Good duel/cat fight!

  • Ivy Lin

    I admit, I’m finding this performance a bit sterile … The energy just isn’t there.

    • DellaCasaFan

      Lackluster from the start.

    • ChesterS

      Me, too. Dull.

  • manou

    I wonder whether they do the ballet

    • manou

      …and here is my answer

    • Camille

      It’s always given
      Not a five act French opera so they allow it.

  • Camille

    Haha! The dance of the Amazons is the old parterre podcast music, if not mistaken!

  • manou

    Overheated Phèdre, I think

    • Camille

      Well it was not in the tradition of la Comédie française, most likely.

      Someone,
      Was it Caballe? Can’t remember, but she did it in a sing-song cadenced style which, I think, mimicked the style of recitation in Adrienne’s day. Forgotten who It was now. La Scotissima, maybe? Anyway, it was very effective w/on being overblown, which is so easy to do.

      Barbara Frittoli is about to do Adriana soon, in Monte Carlo with Alagna, and to my astonishment, Angela Meade will sing it in the future and that I cannot imagine.

      • manou

        More Sue-Ellen in Dallas than Sarah Bernhardt

        • Camille

          I don’t know Sue Ellen at all! Never watched that one but I did watch Dynasty and gloried in Joan Collins’s exploits and maquillage and suits and general demeanor. The “poor man’s
          Liz”, we called her In LA.

          • southerndoc1

            Also known as the British Open.

            • manou

              …whilst Sue-Ellen was the Open Mouth

            • Camille

              Oh dear, dear. That is TERRIBLE!!!

              This is boring me. I went to wash dishes, never a good sign.

              Didn’t Suellen have nervous breakdowns all the time or something? I was so tired of seeing face plastered all over everything television there in the eighties.

              Oh poveri viole!