Cher Public

  • tiger1: I am sure you have – and I should not just have focused on this small lapse but also thanked you for a good review. Sorry. 6:49 AM
  • thenoctambulist: Well, I hear so much of maestro’s works that it hardly leaves me any time for anybody else. I can hardly make... 3:46 AM
  • mrsjohnclaggart: Thank you, Porgy, for being so kind. After I had posted I realized there was more than one poster here with a handle that... 1:55 AM
  • Cicciabella: Thanks, Ed. Everytime I see Callas on video it reinforces how much expression she put in the voice. You can see that she is... 1:43 AM
  • Porgy Amor: Weep no more, mrsjohnclaggart. I just looked at the entry in question (“Soft Center”), and that question was posed... 1:42 AM
  • zinka: httpv://www.youtub LcdZU7s HOLD ON TO YOUR…… ……R 30;……. Albania presents... 1:35 AM
  • Lohenfal: Anti, thanks for the detailed Tosca reviews. It seems that you were able to ignore all the debatable aspects of the production... 12:18 AM
  • la vociaccia: Ignored Cieca’s title, saw “Mascagni 221; and “duet” and am now supremely depressed that it... 11:54 PM

Glass, Gandhi, Occupy: Action

As suggested in Part I of this piece, to experience Glass’s Satyagraha as a purely aesthetic experience is unfortunately to succumb to a romantic ideology promoting detached reflection on art which is wholly inapplicable to such a politically-charged opera. The idea that Gandhi’s action-oriented philosophy would be packaged and sold for the sake of passive introspection would have bothered him deeply. Read more »

Glass, Gandhi, Occupy: Performance

That Philip Glass’s opera about Gandhi’s nonviolent civil disobedience should be revived by the Metropolitan Opera in 2011—a year marked by nonviolent revolutions and uprisings around the globe—is timely, to say the least. The most recent production of his Satyagraha (1979) was first premiered by the Met in the spring of 2008 as America stood on the precipice of the most devastating economic crisis in three-quarters of a century. Read more »

Truth, force

Critic Ann Binlot draws some perhaps rather obvious parallels between Satyagraha and the Occupy Wall Street movement in a brief feature on ARTINFO.