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Cher Public

  • Lady Abbado: Quanto, from the link you posted…in light of not too distant history, the sweetest part... 10:06 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Maria Jeritza 10:00 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: Mariana Nicolesco is 66, not 77. I suppose this was a typo. 9:50 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: Who is the blond anti-aging procedure test subject in the video? 9:48 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=HBHF HT_KTbY 9:48 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Will Angela Gheorghiu appear as scheduled at the Alvin Alley gala? http://www.alvi... 9:28 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: The Mimi and Marcello duet is my favorite part of this opera httpv://www.you... 7:52 PM
  • kashania: What makes you so sure? 7:44 PM
  • willym: Is it customary to wear a hat on Thanksgiving? Such lovely traditions. 7:11 PM
  • La Cieca: In fact, Puccini wrote only the one opera that takes place during Purim. 6:48 PM

Snow business

Every year I say I’m not going to another La Bohème because I’ve seen this too many times. And every year I end up going to multiple performances. I always find an excuse. “Oh there’s so-and-so singing and I haven’t heard him in anything but Madama Butterfly and that doesn’t even count because the tenor doesn’t sing at all after the first act …” But today after I won the lotto for yet another Bohème I wondered if I go simply because the opera (and production) is comfort food. At this point in my second career as an opera-queen-with-two-X-chromosomes, La Bohème doesn’t require very active, pins-and-needles listening. It’s like watching an old MGM musical.  Read more »

Levee duty

If you are of the belief that Show Boat can stand on its own as a classic score and thus doesn’t need the trappings of musical production, you’ll love the New York Philharmonic’s “semi-staged” production. Conductor/director Ted Sperling presents the Jerome Kern/Oscar Hammerstein classic as almost entirely a concert opera. Only a thin backdrop of an old-fashioned river-boat set the scene. The singers and dancers were dressed in modern evening wear, and the action is limited to the thin apron of the Avery Fisher Hall stage. Sperling uses the entire Philharmonic, instead of the usual pared-down orchestra that’s typical for these musical presentations.   Read more »

Side eye and bitch face

At the first intermission at last night’s Met revival of Aida, I turned to my companion and said, “So… what about the Aida? I thought she was supposed to be good.” I had heard so many positive reviews about Liudmyla Monastyrska that I was really expecting something special. Instead, my feelings about her performance progressed from tepid disappointment to outright dismay. I actually can’t recall being so disappointed with a singer.   Read more »

Figaro

Ten thousand bedrooms

The Metropolitan Opera desperately needed a new production of Le nozze di Figaro.

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René Pape

Pape music

There is something so very Don Draper about René Pape .

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Juan and two

I always think of Don Giovanni as half of the greatest opera ever written. Or, actually, about 2/3 of the greatest opera ever written.

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The dark side of the moon

After viewing Stefan Herheim’s production of Rusalka, I’ve got a new category: “regie slick.”

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Bomb scare

The appeal of Ariadne auf Naxos (for me anyway) is the acknowledgment that underneath it all, opera (and all other forms of “high art”) is really show business.

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Rich man’s frug

A good performance of a Rossini opera buffa usually bubbles along merrily.

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Lost in space

It’s rare to encounter a video of an opera that has zero redeeming qualities, but I think I might have found it: the latest Arena di Verona La Traviata.

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