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Cher Public

  • Porgy Amor: How do you know it’s from 1962, though? If one of the names is wrong, the date could be as... 3:51 AM
  • Ouf: Pews. 3:28 AM
  • Cicciabella: The 100,000 euro fee was quoted in relation to normal-sized, unamplified concert halls, not pop... 3:19 AM
  • Ouf: Karajan only led two Fidelio performances in 1962, one with Vickers, the other with Zampieri. See links... 3:15 AM
  • antikitschychick: Completely agree with you Porgy. Also, she has, what 2-3 years of experience singing on an... 2:54 AM
  • antikitschychick: “However, it was quickly apparent that despite all these natural endowments,... 2:41 AM
  • Porgy Amor: Vickers’s son (or one of them, if more than one) is adamant that this is not his father... 2:19 AM
  • Buster: Sad how such a production is allowed to go on without much to redeem it musically.But Dmitry... 2:17 AM
  • Porgy Amor: In Monastyrska’ s defense, while she’s not exactly a born stage animal, she can be... 1:57 AM
  • antikitschychick: Dawbrowski, this is a very cogent and thought-provoking post (and in my defense I did... 1:46 AM

New classic

met_traviata_1Willy Decker’s Traviata has garnered praise from critics and audiences alike in the week since its Metropolitan premiere, but (as was to be expected) this praise comes over the complaints of a select few traditionalists, a handful of lonely boos amid the mostly enthusiastic applause. Their objection (as usual) is that Decker’s production betrays the “original text” of “Verdi’s La Traviata.” But these detractors should consider that La Traviata is a work in which questions of betrayal and fidelity are specifically at issue—one that reminds us that sometimes, counterintuitively, the only way to remain faithful to someone or something is to depart from it.  Read more »

Face time

traviataAs we look forward to New Year’s Eve and to the gala opening of Willy Decker’s La Traviata at the Met, it seems fitting to look back—by way of the official, live, DVD recording of the production’s sensational world premiere at the Salzburg Festival in 2005—to get some sense of what’s behind all the hype. Released in 2005 by Deutsche Grammophon, this recording promises an exciting evening for the Met’s audience on December 31st, but also raises the question of whether the New York premiere will live up to the high expectations set in Salzburg.

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