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  • Camille: Yes, yes, La Cieca, don’t nag me, please, as I am going to at least two of these three and... 1:48 PM
  • marshiemarkII: Lurquie, you reminded me of Renata Scotto at Fiorello’s in 1994 hugging Hildegard̵... 1:48 PM
  • Camille: O fiddle-dee-dee, NPW, you got off a couple good ones and at least you got the gist of it all... 1:46 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Can’t wait to see Nemorino in his underwear atop the telephone pole! 1:42 PM
  • marshiemarkII: Mille grazie arabie!!!! wow can hardly imagine the sheer splendiferousness of the 1968... 1:40 PM
  • marshiemarkII: Manoucee, yes I am sorry to say it was really I-N-T-O-L-E-R-A-B- L-E, it probably didn’t... 1:35 PM
  • Feldmarschallin: Nothing official planned as far as I know. Schwanewilms has cancelled the whole Wien run now... 1:29 PM
  • Camille: “L’imp ortanza di esser Franco” ossia — The FRANCO CORELLI STORY. Thanks for... 1:29 PM
  • Camille: Buster, Regarding your posting of Elisabeth Grümmer in the Meistersinger clip the other day, I would... 1:19 PM
  • kashania: I guess it’s not very gracious of me to point out that DSS’s post is the most... 1:19 PM

Love it to death

Mariusz Trelinski will direct Tristan und Isolde for the Metropolitan Opera in a production that will premiere there on opening night 2016. (The image is from Trelinski’s production of Krol Roger at the Edinburgh International Festival, photo by Marek Grotowski.) [New York Times]

No such Gluck

Mozart tinkered with the Messiah. Mendelssohn adapted choral works by both Handel and Bach. But when Richard Wagner reached into the past and revised Gluck’s Iphigénie en Aulide, he went beyond the accepted boundaries of tinkering and more or less created a new work that’s fomented aesthetic debates ever since.   Read more »

Hothouse flower

To some, Anne Schwanewilms will always be the soprano in the slinky black dress who replaced Deborah Voigt at Covent Garden a decade ago and confirmed the creeping influence of film and television values on the opera world. Read more »

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Sex please: we’re British

The finer performances of Tristan und Isolde have a way of sounding like a four-hour improvisation, the fruit of a single moment of inspiration that makes one forget how emotionally manipulative and painstakingly crafted the music really is.

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The cup runneth over

I am grateful to Sony for this new release of the Metropolitan Opera’s latest production of Parsifal and I hope I’m not the only one who discovers what a rich experience this opera can be because of it.

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Brass ring

Marek Janowski’s survey of Wagner operas on PentaTone so convincingly captures the pulse and dramatic flow of many of the works that the music-making at times sounds almost effortless.

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Critical care

The experience of watching Wagner’s final opera Parsifal is frequently elevated to a spiritual occurrence, and productions have historically emphasized the religious dimension of the opera’s core themes of redemption and the dangers of temptation.

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Coupe de grâce

Our good friends at Opera Depot are currently offering a free download of Parsifal conducted by Hans Knappertsbusch at the 1963 Bayreuth Festival.

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The opposite of canard is truth

“Is Parsifal, then, a religious artwork, or is it a work ‘about’ religion?”

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The music lovers

The curious things about accepted wisdom is that sometimes it’s correct.

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