Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • zinka: Sorry to hear,even from friends NOT prejudiced against the wonderful SQUILLO of Marcello(people call... 9:47 PM
  • Poison Ivy: Guys I found this gem from nearly 20 years ago of Olga Borodina’s Amneris. Look at that... 9:37 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: Palombi was the substitute when Alagna threw a hissy fit at La Scala. 7:41 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: Maybe it’s changed. Domingo’s anecdote was from 1971. 7:39 PM
  • MontyNostry: antikk is right about the Macbeth at Covent Garden – she looked rather glamorous, but so... 7:32 PM
  • antikitschychick: Lmaoooo now that is funny Pavel! I think she looks like a combination of Montsy and... 7:10 PM
  • antikitschychick: Quanto: I highly doubt that’s true given her busy schedule…may be a few years... 7:01 PM
  • MontyNostry: I’ve said this on here before – it’s a shame that an intelligent woman with... 6:54 PM
  • antikitschychick: Ivy, this is an interesting observation but I don’t necessarily agree because, while... 6:54 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Rumor has it that she will begin or is already involved in having a teaching career! 6:54 PM

Spring will be a little late this year

La bohème  is such a popular romantic opera that hardly anyone ever notices that Mimì and Rodolfo undergo what in modern terms would be called speed dating, those meetups where you sit down with a person for five minutes, and decide whether there’s anything. If there is, voilà. If there isn’t, next!   Read more »

Where the boys are

When Norman Lebrecht is declaring on an almost daily basis that classical music is dead, it’s perhaps heartening that four of today’s prominent tenors have recently recorded what might be called fluff/vanity albums.

Joseph Calleja released an album of eclectic love songs, named (what else?) Amore. Hot on its heels is Vittorio Grigolo’s foray into an equally eclectic mix of religious songs, Ave Maria. On a slightly less fluffy level are Rolando Villazón’s album of Mozart concert arias, intriguingly entitled Mozart, and Juan Diego Flórez’s foray into the French spinto/heroic repertoire, named, naturellement, L’amour.   Read more »

A pretty boy milking his bows

The late British critic John Steane once said that he had sworn off all Montserrat Caballé performances after seeing a recital where the famously irreverent soprano, in one of her encores, did a caricature of Elisabeth Schwarzkopf. (He considered it undignified.) I can only imagine what Mr. Steane would have thought of Vittorio Grigolo. Caballé was merely (perhaps) snarky. This afternoon at the Met, Grigolo sold his performance like the rent was due tomorrow and he was down to his last penny.   Read more »

grigolo

In solitaria stanza

La Cieca alerts the cher public to be on the lookout for discounts and downright giveaways for the upcoming Vittorio Grigolo recital at the Met.

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requiem_amazon

Bowled over

I never thought I’d see the day when Giuseppe Verdi and Benjamin Britten would battle it out for musical superiority but that’s exactly what happened in Los Angeles this year.

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jj_post

Young man with a horn

Ring a ding ding! There’s a new Duke in town, and he’s jolting the Met’s Rigoletto with enough electricity to light up the Las Vegas Strip.

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new_puritans

Our retrospection will now be all to the future

La Cieca predicts you won’t be seeing any puritans at the Met next season, except of course for the ones who slouch around during intermission hissing, “You call that a trill?”

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odorama

Scent of mystery

La Cieca has been sniffing around her generally reliable (and fragrant) sources, and she thinks she has pieced together a list of the dozen operas to be featured in the 2013-2014 season of “The Met: Live in HD.”

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Airborne

La Cieca’s spy in London reports: “So first Angela Gheorghiu cancelled this evening’s Traviata Faust at the ROH. On hearing the news, Vittorio Grigolo suddenly came down with a ‘chest infection’ —so the performance is going ahead with James Valenti and Malin Byström.”

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First Cause Argument

“I saw the dress rehearsal of the Covent Garden Manon, and Vittorio had that metaphysical connection with the audience. I’m convinced of his potential.” [New York Times]

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