Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • moritz: You’re welcome, Porgy. I probably should have included the next sentence of the review as well:... 4:20 PM
  • Gualtier M: BTW: there is another whole generation of young Italian singers working all over Italy. This... 4:14 PM
  • antikitschychick: This took place on Sept. 28th so very recently :-). I second your concern about the burnout... 4:11 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: I’ve heard that they don’t clap after this aria at ROH. It was even... 4:10 PM
  • damekenneth: I always seem to confuse Riccardo Massi with Massimo Giordani, another goodish looking Italian... 4:10 PM
  • 98rsd: Sheer hypocrisy of attending a baseball game–because of Ebola? (The sound of a head shaking) 4:08 PM
  • operainsider: I use to believe the “Aida is the boring role” or “the opera should be called... 4:07 PM
  • 98rsd: That said, I just listened to the Celeste Aida and he sounds rather unsteady. Listen to the... 3:46 PM
  • 98rsd: The audience there doesn’t burst into applause at every opportunity. I’m not sure Kaufmann... 3:36 PM
  • Milady DeWinter: That was a wonderful (and funny) image – does the muddy ascent make that note... 3:28 PM

Equal rites

As with all good myths, certainly all the myths at the heart of Wagner’s operas, the juggling of symbols and archetypes and themes in Parsifal opens the piece to a great variety of interpretations. Many recent productions have twisted things in a way that seemed to strain or defy Wagner’s intricate libretto and lush, meticulous score: gray springtimes in a world beyond nuclear or environmental holocaust, that sort of thing. But the world of Wagner’s tale is, like our own, a world in crisis, on a razor’s edge. That’s bound to resonate with contemporary directors. They then have many options in setting out the workings of the crisis in this fable of a solution to whatever may be broken.   Read more »