Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Chirper: Speaking of early in the game, I believe the musicians voted to strike about 7 or 8 weeks ago in the... 1:24 PM
  • NPW-Paris: And R. Fleming tested Il Pirata on us in Paris. After that, I thought she’d drop the idea... 1:17 PM
  • peter: Mediation!: http://tinyurl.com /oq87ne4 1:07 PM
  • Milady DeWinter: Claycomb is outstanding – and does (or used to) a VERY unusual (but effective) cadenza... 1:06 PM
  • armerjacquino: Ha, Monty. The word ‘Commonwealt h’ is one I only usually ever see on here, so for... 1:03 PM
  • MontyNostry: … and he had sung Pinkerton at ENO in London. (Another of those talented North Americans... 12:58 PM
  • Clita del Toro: Well, Kaufmann barely “opened up” in Act I of Parsifal, and I found it a bit... 12:55 PM
  • La Cieca: The Pinkerton at the Met I think was a “last-minute ” casting change; that is, after... 12:50 PM
  • Clita del Toro: Amneerees, strange, I absolutely adore Bergonzi, and he is one of my all time fav tenors,... 12:47 PM
  • MontyNostry: I think Hymel is a terrific singer, but – if I were a casting director – I... 12:43 PM

Equal rites

As with all good myths, certainly all the myths at the heart of Wagner’s operas, the juggling of symbols and archetypes and themes in Parsifal opens the piece to a great variety of interpretations. Many recent productions have twisted things in a way that seemed to strain or defy Wagner’s intricate libretto and lush, meticulous score: gray springtimes in a world beyond nuclear or environmental holocaust, that sort of thing. But the world of Wagner’s tale is, like our own, a world in crisis, on a razor’s edge. That’s bound to resonate with contemporary directors. They then have many options in setting out the workings of the crisis in this fable of a solution to whatever may be broken.   Read more »