Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • La Cieca: Netrebko has already announced she is singing Aida. This “weepy waily” stuff is a... 11:32 AM
  • armerjacquino: We discussed this before, but Aida has agency as a character; she makes her own decisions and... 11:30 AM
  • alejandro: Wow. She sounds delish! My money is tight this season so not sure if I’ll make this but who... 11:21 AM
  • Porgy Amor: and how strong and modern she is That “she” being AN; her view of Leonora was just... 11:17 AM
  • Porgy Amor: But is weepy, wimpy Aida AN’s type of gal? Don’t think so. Well, I don’t think... 11:13 AM
  • Ouf: Karajan’s new staging. Hmm. Odd that the second performance wasn’t until June 12. If true,... 11:06 AM
  • Milady DeWinter: Thanks for that DSS! Sarah Willis is indeed a real joy – I always find her little so... 11:06 AM
  • DeepSouthSenior: The most famous passage from Luther on the gift and value of music: Foreword to Georg... 10:58 AM
  • DonCarloFanatic: This Aida production, for all its faults, is far better than the previous one, which was... 10:55 AM
  • Poison Ivy: By the way, I found this. He could barely stand, and his voice sometimes sounds weak and... 10:55 AM

Equal rites

As with all good myths, certainly all the myths at the heart of Wagner’s operas, the juggling of symbols and archetypes and themes in Parsifal opens the piece to a great variety of interpretations. Many recent productions have twisted things in a way that seemed to strain or defy Wagner’s intricate libretto and lush, meticulous score: gray springtimes in a world beyond nuclear or environmental holocaust, that sort of thing. But the world of Wagner’s tale is, like our own, a world in crisis, on a razor’s edge. That’s bound to resonate with contemporary directors. They then have many options in setting out the workings of the crisis in this fable of a solution to whatever may be broken.   Read more »