Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Grane: I grew up with the LP! Which I still have somewhere, though that probably isn’t at its best... 10:39 AM
  • manou: Well – hit and myth. 10:35 AM
  • NPW-Paris: Legends are often myths. 10:00 AM
  • lastregamarzapane: I share that soft spot with you, Grane. Yes, Sills was vocally past her best, but she... 9:52 AM
  • Cicciabella: Publishing rehearsal clips before things have gelled is not a great idea. The choreograpy in... 9:41 AM
  • Krunoslav: Plus, as Valencienne, Commonwealth artist Glenys Fowles, far and away the worst Micaela and Oscar... 9:24 AM
  • NPW-Paris: I like her too. Saw her as Lucia and Lucrezia Borgia, in both cases at the Cirque Royal in... 9:20 AM
  • Krunoslav: Let’s not forget DIANA VON SOLANGE! Metropolitan Opera House January 9, 1891 United States... 9:15 AM
  • Grane: I have a soft spot for the recorded City Opera production with Alan Titus and Bubbles, although she... 9:06 AM
  • messa di voce: Yes, based on a 4 minute rehearsal room clip of a show that hasn’t opened, it’s... 9:03 AM

Equal rites

As with all good myths, certainly all the myths at the heart of Wagner’s operas, the juggling of symbols and archetypes and themes in Parsifal opens the piece to a great variety of interpretations. Many recent productions have twisted things in a way that seemed to strain or defy Wagner’s intricate libretto and lush, meticulous score: gray springtimes in a world beyond nuclear or environmental holocaust, that sort of thing. But the world of Wagner’s tale is, like our own, a world in crisis, on a razor’s edge. That’s bound to resonate with contemporary directors. They then have many options in setting out the workings of the crisis in this fable of a solution to whatever may be broken.   Read more »