Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • turings: Thanks, manou – very funny! Calleja reminds me a bit of Ramon Vargas – lovely lyric voice, seems... 6:28 AM
  • NPW-Paris: I saw that Lakmé. You were better off just hearing it. 4:16 AM
  • NPW-Paris: Some of us here have also seen it (and discussed it) and found it a disappointment. 4:02 AM
  • MontyNostry: I’ve always found Ken Russell’s (admittedly rather tacky, but that’s Ken for... 3:41 AM
  • armerjacquino: Whoa there. ‘Matronly 217; doesn’t mean the same as ‘maternal 217;. 2:53 AM
  • armerjacquino: Shicoff was no slouch either. 2:52 AM
  • guy pacifica: Thanks for posting that snippet of Aria. A reminder that I must watch it again. There are some... 2:36 AM
  • Krunoslav: Croatia a/k/a Dalmatia produced several “ItalianR 17; opera singers, including Ester... 1:47 AM
  • Krunoslav: ‘When was last superb Rodolfo [--] Carreras???’ Fabiano is excellent, but I’ll... 1:24 AM
  • antikitschychick: goodness what a harsh review! Poor Joseph Calleja is reduced to a Teddy Bear…and... 12:35 AM

Bows and arias

Whenever opera-lovers are canvassed about what neglected operas they hunger to see revived, the resulting lists inevitably feature a goodly number of grand operas, those once wildly popular monstrosities–particularly by Meyerbeer–written primarily for Paris in the mid-19th century. Yet despite the enthusiasm of their advocates, these works have had a hard time regaining a place in the repertoire in the 21st century. Although a recent revival of Auber’s La Muette de Portici was well received at the Opéra-Comique in Paris, Covent Garden’s splashy new Robert le Diable by Meyerbeer flopped and the Met has never revived its 2003 production of Halévy’s La JuiveRead more »

Swiss you were here

The Pierre Audi production of Guillaume Tell has opened at De Nederlandse Opera, and the staging (destined for the Met* circa 2018) has been pronounced a “triumphant success.” There’s a glimpse of the show after the jump. Read more »

Happy Leap Day!

Not only is it Rossini’s 53rd birthday but also an opportunity to celebrate the art of the intervallic leap. YouTube yourselves into frenzy, cher public! Read more »

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Behold, his mighty score!

Oh, Rossini, Rossini! You mad, adorable fool! What power could you find in the theaters of Paris to keep you from Neapolitan arms? If you are fond of Rossini (or any other major composer), you will want to collect the whole set. Each piece of the jigsaw adds detail to the picture, but there are switchbacks and double-exposures that can be tricky, as the busy and hugely successful young composer recycled or redeveloped old, ill-received or, in a new location, unfamiliar material.  

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grand hotel

From the Vienna State Opera in January 1988, the first part of the Rossini opera you, cher public, chose: Il viaggio a Reims. Among the all-star cast in this episode of Unnatural Acts of Opera:

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le public affair

The cher public have spoken, and their chosen Rossini oeuvre, to be featured on the next Unnatural Acts of Opera, is…

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rossini runoff

Here’s a snapshot of the current Unnatural Acts of Opera poll:

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armida? i hardly know her!

The solution to the “D’amor al dolce impero” quiz … Maria Callas Renata Scotto Katia Ricciarrelli Christina Deutekom Adelaide Negri Renee Fleming Jennifer Larmore Christine Weidinger Nelly Miricioiu Maja Tabatadze Cecilia Gasdia Montserrat Caballe

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the cieca caucus

Faust (Gounod) Acts 4 and 5 Since our this podcast completes our series of Faust episodes, La Cieca needs to decide which work should be featured next on “Unnatural Acts of Opera.” Your doyenne has narrowed the selection down to five works of maestro Rossini, and now it’s up to you, cher public, to tell her which of these five you want to hear.

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