Cher Public

  • antikitschychick: sorry my comment was in response to armerj’s post above concerning AN and Lady Macbeth. 9:23 PM
  • antikitschychick: Lol completely agree with everything you said here. I was actually surprised at how campy I found AN’s Lady... 9:21 PM
  • antikitschychick: well Cocky since she is sharing the role/run of Tosca with Anja Harteros I don’t think it’s out of the... 8:53 PM
  • phoenix: Only saw Anna once onstage: http://tinyurl.com /glqlhtr Natasha Rostova suited her very well but I never heard her sing with such... 8:31 PM
  • armerjacquino: I think, as ever, it depends on the director. In that Salzburg BOHEME she was genuinely remarkable as an actor- maybe the... 6:52 PM
  • Signor Bruschino: I completely agree- dreadful conducting. And when he was conducting South Pacific, during the dialogue scenes, he would... 6:34 PM
  • RosinaLeckermaul: Yes, rewriting classics was typical in the Restoration. Shakespeare was considered a genius, but one who needed editing... 6:07 PM
  • la vociaccia: I thought Sperling’s conducting in THE KING AND I was dreadful; rushed, shallow and completely without sweep or... 5:44 PM

Bows and arias

Whenever opera-lovers are canvassed about what neglected operas they hunger to see revived, the resulting lists inevitably feature a goodly number of grand operas, those once wildly popular monstrosities–particularly by Meyerbeer–written primarily for Paris in the mid-19th century. Yet despite the enthusiasm of their advocates, these works have had a hard time regaining a place in the repertoire in the 21st century. Although a recent revival of Auber’s La Muette de Portici was well received at the Opéra-Comique in Paris, Covent Garden’s splashy new Robert le Diable by Meyerbeer flopped and the Met has never revived its 2003 production of Halévy’s La JuiveRead more »

Swiss you were here

The Pierre Audi production of Guillaume Tell has opened at De Nederlandse Opera, and the staging (destined for the Met* circa 2018) has been pronounced a “triumphant success.” There’s a glimpse of the show after the jump. Read more »

Happy Leap Day!

Not only is it Rossini’s 53rd birthday but also an opportunity to celebrate the art of the intervallic leap. YouTube yourselves into frenzy, cher public! Read more »

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Behold, his mighty score!

Oh, Rossini, Rossini! You mad, adorable fool! What power could you find in the theaters of Paris to keep you from Neapolitan arms? If you are fond of Rossini (or any other major composer), you will want to collect the whole set. Each piece of the jigsaw adds detail to the picture, but there are switchbacks and double-exposures that can be tricky, as the busy and hugely successful young composer recycled or redeveloped old, ill-received or, in a new location, unfamiliar material.  

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grand hotel

From the Vienna State Opera in January 1988, the first part of the Rossini opera you, cher public, chose: Il viaggio a Reims. Among the all-star cast in this episode of Unnatural Acts of Opera:

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le public affair

The cher public have spoken, and their chosen Rossini oeuvre, to be featured on the next Unnatural Acts of Opera, is…

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rossini runoff

Here’s a snapshot of the current Unnatural Acts of Opera poll:

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armida? i hardly know her!

The solution to the “D’amor al dolce impero” quiz … Maria Callas Renata Scotto Katia Ricciarrelli Christina Deutekom Adelaide Negri Renee Fleming Jennifer Larmore Christine Weidinger Nelly Miricioiu Maja Tabatadze Cecilia Gasdia Montserrat Caballe

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the cieca caucus

Faust (Gounod) Acts 4 and 5 Since our this podcast completes our series of Faust episodes, La Cieca needs to decide which work should be featured next on “Unnatural Acts of Opera.” Your doyenne has narrowed the selection down to five works of maestro Rossini, and now it’s up to you, cher public, to tell her which of these five you want to hear.

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