Cher Public

  • antikitschychick: sorry my comment was in response to armerj’s post above concerning AN and Lady Macbeth. 9:23 PM
  • antikitschychick: Lol completely agree with everything you said here. I was actually surprised at how campy I found AN’s Lady... 9:21 PM
  • antikitschychick: well Cocky since she is sharing the role/run of Tosca with Anja Harteros I don’t think it’s out of the... 8:53 PM
  • phoenix: Only saw Anna once onstage: http://tinyurl.com /glqlhtr Natasha Rostova suited her very well but I never heard her sing with such... 8:31 PM
  • armerjacquino: I think, as ever, it depends on the director. In that Salzburg BOHEME she was genuinely remarkable as an actor- maybe the... 6:52 PM
  • Signor Bruschino: I completely agree- dreadful conducting. And when he was conducting South Pacific, during the dialogue scenes, he would... 6:34 PM
  • RosinaLeckermaul: Yes, rewriting classics was typical in the Restoration. Shakespeare was considered a genius, but one who needed editing... 6:07 PM
  • la vociaccia: I thought Sperling’s conducting in THE KING AND I was dreadful; rushed, shallow and completely without sweep or... 5:44 PM

The chopping block?

Chopping block“After five flops in a row, Mr. McVicar continues to win new assignments from the Met: in the 2017-2018 season alone, he’s booked for Bellini’s Norma and Puccini’s Tosca, with Cilea’s Adriana Lecouvreur down the line.” [Observer]

The devil is in the details

Certain operas are better in theory than practice. Boito’s Mefistofele has some undoubtedly fine tunes, and is perhaps neck-and-neck with Boris Godunov as a top bass star vehicle. But as an opera, it only works in fits and starts. For one, the fidelity to Goethe’s Faust gives the libretto a rather episodic, detached feel.

Gounod’s Faust might be a lot cheesier but it’s also more tightly focused and thus better theater. Boito’s opera has some some stunning choral work in the Prologue and Epilogue, a famous tune in Margherita’s lament “La altra notte” and an extremely enjoyable “Walpurgis Nacht” act but also a lot of filler. It’s not a long opera but it feels endless.   Read more »

The diva wears Prada

“Oubliez le XVIIIè siècle. A l’Opéra Comique, Platée s’installe sur les podiums d’une fashion week parisienne!” Unfortunately, the video of this performance is not available in the US: La Cieca will keep you updated. Meanwhile, take a look at DeCaffarrelli’s review of last night’s concert performance.

platee

Nymph errant

“German fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld is a household name; 18th-century French composer Jean-Philippe Rameau isn’t.”

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Sir John and the horse

Come to the unstable

How, then, to explain the perplexing performance last Friday night of Falstaff, Mr. Levine’s first new production since his return?

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rigoletto

The rise of the clowns

What better way to spend a lazy Friday afternoon in midsummer than watching a webcast of Rigoletto?

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Behind the red curtain

It was indeed a curious sensation  making a late morning trek to East 59th Street, a block devoted to showro0ms for bizarre upscale furniture and lighting fixtures, and then to enter a boutique cinema specializing in Hindi films (the big coming attraction right now is Desi Boyz) — and all this before sitting down in an auditiorium half- full of retirees to see a live performance of Don Giovanni from La Scala. That it worked as a Mozart experience I think can be chalked up to two factors: Robert Carsen‘s production and the constantly improving (if still imperfect) HD technology. 

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Mirror, mirror

La Cieca is just back from the HD of Don Giovanni from La Scala: excellent singing through the whole cast, strong conducting (if tending to the slow side) by Daniel Barenboim, and a smart, chic production from Robert Carsen that frankly makes Michael Grandage look like an utter bumpkin. The presentation will repeat here in New York (and elsewhere) in coming days.

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