Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Camille: Are you in this one, armerjay? Do you know this man, let me tey to spell his name Chewetel Eijiofor?... 4:29 PM
  • jrance: I think that a major issue here is that Gelb has been spending money so freely and touting how... 4:25 PM
  • semira mide: Interesting. I just passed the “campus̶ 1; this weekend and thought wistfully about... 4:22 PM
  • Buster: Never heard Sari in this, Camille. The only Saffi’s I know well are Sena Jurinac (just... 4:17 PM
  • kashania: Oedipe: Vogt as Bacchus sounds great! That should be quite a pairing. 4:10 PM
  • zinka: I left after act one..what a bore..all of them..Best voice was David Crawford who had two lines..The... 4:07 PM
  • zinka: In case you might doubt some of the things I will say in this post, just go to either “La Puma... 4:06 PM
  • armerjacquino: Those wanting to celebrate Shakespeare’ s birthday could always, ahem, pop to their... 4:05 PM
  • semira mide: I totally agree. And what keeps it from being comedy ( in the sense that I was taught) is that... 4:03 PM
  • semira mide: If I find it, I will “mark the score” and pass it on to you! You are absolutely... 3:59 PM

Farinelli from heaven

Many contemporary opera-lovers must rue that they can never hear such 19th century icons as Wilhelmine Schröder-Devrient or Adolphe Nourrit or the Garcia sisters, Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot. But my impossible wish would be to hear one of the great castrati who dominated opera for most of the 18th century. I’m not the only one intrigued by these (mercifully) now-extinct musical anomalies—it’s a fascination that continues into the 21st century as heard on three variously compelling recent castrato-oriented CDs by countertenors David Hansen, Franco Fagioli and Philippe Jaroussky. In addition, the latter’s current US tour stopped by the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Grace Rainey Rogers auditorium Tuesday evening. Read more »

Happy Birthday Philippe Jaroussky!

The French countertenor is 35 years old today. Read more »