Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Bill: Buster – My guess it is the Barber of Seville. Later in her career Pons was singing only a... 3:19 PM
  • Buster: Thanks, both, will look him up. How could Miss Pons possibly sing, wasp-waisted like that? 3:10 PM
  • Tamino: Glad to hear that the Lowell House Queen of Spades is so good. They have done some wonderful... 2:54 PM
  • ipomoea: Re: Lowell House Queen of Spades Has anyone heard the second cast? Tenor is Mikhail Urusov. On YT:... 2:32 PM
  • Bill: Buster – Conley was a lyric tenor singing at the Met in the early 1950s (perhaps before) in Don... 2:17 PM
  • armerjacquino: Rather lovely tenor. Most famous as the first recorded Tom Rakewell. 2:14 PM
  • Buster: http://tinyurl.com /qdmkrse 2:14 PM
  • Buster: Eugene Conley, apparently. Never heard of him: 2:11 PM
  • marshiemarkII: Wow Kashie, thanks for finding this!!!!!!!!!!! she is so GLORIOUS!!!! the tone is so noble and... 2:09 PM
  • kashania: Marshie: Well, this “Es gibt ein Reich” is definitely good. It’s probably the... 2:01 PM

Farinelli from heaven

Many contemporary opera-lovers must rue that they can never hear such 19th century icons as Wilhelmine Schröder-Devrient or Adolphe Nourrit or the Garcia sisters, Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot. But my impossible wish would be to hear one of the great castrati who dominated opera for most of the 18th century. I’m not the only one intrigued by these (mercifully) now-extinct musical anomalies—it’s a fascination that continues into the 21st century as heard on three variously compelling recent castrato-oriented CDs by countertenors David Hansen, Franco Fagioli and Philippe Jaroussky. In addition, the latter’s current US tour stopped by the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Grace Rainey Rogers auditorium Tuesday evening. Read more »

Happy Birthday Philippe Jaroussky!

The French countertenor is 35 years old today. Read more »