Cher Public

  • Angelo Saccosta: Very well said, Chris, as always. Thank you. Mascagni’s connection and friendship with Puccini become more and more... 6:42 AM
  • La Cieca: Surely the custom of little or no applause after the first act had at least some basis in the way the act ends, i.e., very... 6:03 AM
  • 98rsd: LT…i don’t know how old you are, but the Publicans have been drumming up fake Clinton scandals for decades, from... 5:38 AM
  • 98rsd: What a surprise…a Trump voter who, first, injects race into the topic–and then thinks slavery is no big deal! 5:28 AM
  • LT: This years’ Operalia final took place Sunday. It seems that it was a very inconspicuous edition since no one is talking about... 12:37 AM
  • Krunoslav: Favorite Kundry on records? Martha Moedl. I also greatly liked four that I have seen onstage: Christa Ludwig, Tatiana... 11:42 PM
  • Krunoslav: My first Met PARSIFAL in 1977 had practically no applause after Act One, and as a “knowingR 17; student I thought... 11:37 PM
  • PCally: Out of curiosity, who is your favorite Kundry? 11:08 PM

Martyr system

Other than Israel in Egypt and Messiah, Handel’s English oratorios aren’t all that different from his operas—characters under duress trading da capo arias—except for all those choruses. But what choruses! William Christie’s Les Arts Florissants made a much-anticipated appearance at Lincoln Center’s White Light Festival Saturday performing Theodora and the always stellar group reveled in that demanding work’s magnificent choruses transforming them into the highpoints of an otherwise oddly unmoving evening.  Read more »

Farinelli from heaven

Many contemporary opera-lovers must rue that they can never hear such 19th century icons as Wilhelmine Schröder-Devrient or Adolphe Nourrit or the Garcia sisters, Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot. But my impossible wish would be to hear one of the great castrati who dominated opera for most of the 18th century. I’m not the only one intrigued by these (mercifully) now-extinct musical anomalies—it’s a fascination that continues into the 21st century as heard on three variously compelling recent castrato-oriented CDs by countertenors David Hansen, Franco Fagioli and Philippe Jaroussky. In addition, the latter’s current US tour stopped by the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Grace Rainey Rogers auditorium Tuesday evening. Read more »

Happy Birthday Philippe Jaroussky!

The French countertenor is 35 years old today. Read more »