Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • m. croche: Speaking of which, I’m not entirely sure what the monkey in part three at 53:50 is trying to... 1:29 AM
  • luvtennis: I must confess. I adore and revere Elizabeth Montgomery. Those early black and white episodes... 12:42 AM
  • Batty Masetto: Fascinating. (Leave it to Croche). In light of Manou’s lament about not looking at... 12:41 AM
  • Rackon: +1 12:37 AM
  • ML: Quanto, souffleur/souffleu se not feasible on large stage. 12:16 AM
  • m. croche: (Blue mask, in case you were wondering….) 12:04 AM
  • DeepSouthSenior: Maybe we’re getting a glimpse into which line items of the budget were – ahem!... 11:58 PM
  • m. croche: Manou – off topic to your off topic. You asked in chat about Tibetan opera. I finally found... 11:54 PM
  • Batty Masetto: Manou dear, after such a plethora of grand-offspring in nappies that must be changed I should... 11:24 PM
  • Operngasse: From the roundtable of Sutherland, Horne, and Arroyo, a great Met prompter anecdote from 4:10 to... 11:13 PM

Farinelli from heaven

Many contemporary opera-lovers must rue that they can never hear such 19th century icons as Wilhelmine Schröder-Devrient or Adolphe Nourrit or the Garcia sisters, Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot. But my impossible wish would be to hear one of the great castrati who dominated opera for most of the 18th century. I’m not the only one intrigued by these (mercifully) now-extinct musical anomalies—it’s a fascination that continues into the 21st century as heard on three variously compelling recent castrato-oriented CDs by countertenors David Hansen, Franco Fagioli and Philippe Jaroussky. In addition, the latter’s current US tour stopped by the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Grace Rainey Rogers auditorium Tuesday evening. Read more »

Happy Birthday Philippe Jaroussky!

The French countertenor is 35 years old today. Read more »