Cher Public

  • SF Guy: R. Strauss has gotten a free pass from many, but not from Ken Russell: httpv://www.youtub JHq7LMs 2:44 AM
  • armerjacquino: Never underestimate the attraction of a light workload. A male lead with an important scene, which also happens to take up... 2:12 AM
  • zinka: httpv://www.youtub oiLTu1U So WHAT if some phrases are from his Bar Mitzvah song..Gigli wept all over..Listen to... 1:58 AM
  • marshiemarkII: If by the first 45 minutes of Act III you mean to include the Wahn Wahn Uberall Wahn Monologue, I’d have to say that... 1:18 AM
  • marshiemarkII: And should not fail to mention the great Winkler, what a powerful and well produced voice he had and in service of so much... 12:55 AM
  • marshiemarkII: I am just back from my fourth Lulu, and Marlis Petersen and Susan Graham are the two greatest singing actresses on earth... 12:52 AM
  • Poison Ivy: I’m going to play devil’s advocate here and say that the darkness of some of Wagners work isn’t something... 12:29 AM
  • Rosemont: Thank you, Batty. This is so informative and well put. (Why don’t R. Strauss, Bruckner, and even LVB get the “Nazi... 12:20 AM

Martyr system

Other than Israel in Egypt and Messiah, Handel’s English oratorios aren’t all that different from his operas—characters under duress trading da capo arias—except for all those choruses. But what choruses! William Christie’s Les Arts Florissants made a much-anticipated appearance at Lincoln Center’s White Light Festival Saturday performing Theodora and the always stellar group reveled in that demanding work’s magnificent choruses transforming them into the highpoints of an otherwise oddly unmoving evening.  Read more »

Farinelli from heaven

Many contemporary opera-lovers must rue that they can never hear such 19th century icons as Wilhelmine Schröder-Devrient or Adolphe Nourrit or the Garcia sisters, Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot. But my impossible wish would be to hear one of the great castrati who dominated opera for most of the 18th century. I’m not the only one intrigued by these (mercifully) now-extinct musical anomalies—it’s a fascination that continues into the 21st century as heard on three variously compelling recent castrato-oriented CDs by countertenors David Hansen, Franco Fagioli and Philippe Jaroussky. In addition, the latter’s current US tour stopped by the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Grace Rainey Rogers auditorium Tuesday evening. Read more »

Happy Birthday Philippe Jaroussky!

The French countertenor is 35 years old today. Read more »