Cher Public

  • Camille: Thanks, fellows, for your discussion of Jessica Pratt as I have been a bit curious about her since having heard Monty ostry speak... 5:37 PM
  • Camille: Grazie Madonna Laura for reporting in on this and—dountless—Sign ora Devia, or her minions reported to her, that this very hot... 5:31 PM
  • jackoh: Here is a story that I would like to see told, either in print or in a documentary or a fictional creation or any other form. That... 5:26 PM
  • Camille: Thanks for putting this up, QPF! As I once found a recording of this in a yard sale a long time ago but have rarely had the... 5:09 PM
  • armerjacquino: That is a CAST. 5:04 PM
  • LondonCyclist: Yesss! :D Was about to wish her good luck, but she’d made it before I managed. >I make a point of sitting up close... 5:03 PM
  • Camille: ‘What Peter Gelb thinks’ is the thought that entertained me for a short while after seeing his presence quite... 4:57 PM
  • Laura Amorosa: Ms.Devia apparently took the high D tonight in Madrid. So maybe she was not 100% or maybe she waited for the last show :) 4:49 PM

Farinelli from heaven

Many contemporary opera-lovers must rue that they can never hear such 19th century icons as Wilhelmine Schröder-Devrient or Adolphe Nourrit or the Garcia sisters, Maria Malibran and Pauline Viardot. But my impossible wish would be to hear one of the great castrati who dominated opera for most of the 18th century. I’m not the only one intrigued by these (mercifully) now-extinct musical anomalies—it’s a fascination that continues into the 21st century as heard on three variously compelling recent castrato-oriented CDs by countertenors David Hansen, Franco Fagioli and Philippe Jaroussky. In addition, the latter’s current US tour stopped by the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Grace Rainey Rogers auditorium Tuesday evening. Read more »

Happy Birthday Philippe Jaroussky!

The French countertenor is 35 years old today. Read more »