Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Will: Funny, what the Archbishop says of Swing is very close to the moral condemnation of the waltz when it... 10:23 AM
  • Lindoro Almaviva: Sometime ago, we were discussing the differences on the Myuto vs the La Scala release of... 10:22 AM
  • Bill: In general at the Met singers do not take solo bows after an aria (unless it ends the act) and in... 10:05 AM
  • Bill: Quanto – None of the cars shown in this video seem to be of 1938 vintage but older by at least 5... 9:53 AM
  • Bill: Monday Nights at the old Met were always dress nights as the regular box holders kept their traditions... 9:45 AM
  • Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin: From a review of “Don Carlo” at the Met in 1922 at which Chaliapin... 9:20 AM
  • Krunoslav: Gwyneth Jones returned to the stage for a bow after “Abscheulicher!” at the Met in 1976. And... 7:24 AM
  • The Conte: If there’s one thing that a chap doesn’t need reminding of on a Saturday morning,... 7:15 AM
  • Olivero is my Drug of Choice: I didn’t know she had recorded these. Netrebko/Barenboim in Four Last... 5:37 AM
  • SF Guy: SFO has done Tosca so often lately, there are now four clipfest previews on YouTube; Jagde has been... 5:33 AM

The subject was Moses

“Like the Israelites who cross the Red Sea in Moses in Egypt, New York City Opera has a long, hard road ahead of it. But the company’s performance Sunday of this Rossini rarity offered a glimpse of a promising future.” [New York Post]

Young man with a horn

“Ring a ding ding! There’s a new Duke in town, and he’s jolting the Met’s Rigoletto with enough electricity to light up the Las Vegas Strip. It’s Vittorio Grigolo, who flaunted a big, trumpeting tenor and a megawatt personality when he made his company debut in the role Saturday night.” [New York Post]

Nel tuo seno, amico sassone

“Bollywood dance numbers, kung fu fighting, simulated nudity — and rock-solid musical values — added up to a sterling Giulio Cesare at at the Met.” [New York Post]

mouseys

Mousecapades

Our Own JJ (not pictured) just came running into the parterre offices wild-eyed with excitement.

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Faustian, but no bargain

“The spring season at the Met is as changeable as March weather in New York: crisp and brilliant for a day or two, and then suddenly as dismal as Thursday night’s Faust.”

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Emperor of the perverse

Short as Roman emperor Eliogabalo’s reign was, the world sighed in relief when it was over.

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Bright young thing

Thursday’s Met performance of the Verdi tearjerker featured a major find: Diana Damrau, who, in her first outing as Violetta, mesmerized with her gleaming soprano and ferocious acting.

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Excess d’estime

It’s not often operagoers leave humming the scenery, but that was the case Monday, when the Met hauled out Riccardo Zandonai’s Francesca da Rimini from the vault.

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The use of wond’rin’

With Wednesday’s stellar staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel, the New York Philharmonic joyously put the ‘music’ back into the Broadway musical.

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Miles to go

When is good enough not quite good enough?

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