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Cher Public

  • Camille: Speaking of Amsterdamer Manon Lescauts—this is the recording where I happened, alone and untutored... 1:25 PM
  • Camille: Really?? I had some hopes for this recording and am desolate to hear this news. At any rate, I shall... 1:01 PM
  • mercadante: It’s extremely well documented in letters with Piave and letters concerning the changes... 12:54 PM
  • zinka: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=A9DJ d2vyRuw How many TOWELS in our lifetime would we need to catch... 12:27 PM
  • Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin: “… and two hard-boiled eggs.” 12:21 PM
  • MontyNostry: Four years ago, when Keenlyside first sang Rigoletto with Welsh National Opera, it was... 12:09 PM
  • k0000: “grandiloque nt” isn’t the word you want here; it means “pretentious ,”... 11:46 AM
  • Milady DeWinter: So glad you finally caught up with “Night at the Opera”, AntiK- what a great... 11:14 AM
  • Milady DeWinter: Oh, I wish whoever has that Isotta would open the treasure chest. I think I even like to... 11:12 AM
  • La Cieca: Perhaps you will be so kind as to share documentation of how Verdi conceived Rigoletto should look... 10:44 AM

It’s complicated

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg is a problematic opera—or, rather, it is an  opera that has, in the last century or so, become problematic. Its composer,  Richard Wagner, was a profound artist who insisted in treating on profound  themes: Life, Death, Love, Redemption and so forth. In this opera, though, his  focus shifted to different universalities: Art and (here comes the troubling  part) what you might call ‘German-ness’.” [New York Observer] (Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera)

Rossini crescendo

“Are we really only two months into the Met season? After acrimonious union negotiations that threatened to shutter the company, music director James Levine’s first opening night in four years, Anna Netrebko’s coruscating Lady Macbeth, the first night of Death of Klinghoffer disrupted by protesters, and, lately, a rash of star cancellation, it seems like it should be April already and we should be preparing to put the season to bed.” Sooner or later, Our Own JJ (not pictured) gets around to discussing the Met’s Barbiere di Siviglia and Juilliard’s Turco in Italia in this week’s New York Observer. (Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera)

Dullsville

“At a busy repertory company like the Metropolitan Opera there are inevitably interesting nights and not-so-interesting nights, but it’s difficult to recall a performance of such stultifying dullness as last Thursday’s performance of Aida. Undercasting and ragged ensemble utterly blunted the impact of Verdi’s classic score. This was the kind of night that proves the haters right: sometimes opera is boring.” [New York Observer]

Figaro

Wedding bell blues

“So it’s twice as disappointing that Monday night’s performance of the Mozart masterpiece turned into a four-hour fizzle.”

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protester

Chorus of the exiled protesters

“I applaud the Klinghoffer protesters for voicing their opinions, but that doesn’t stop me from saying that I find those opinions ill-informed, inept and downright dangerous.”

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Callas Edition

Divina, deconstructed

“The sensation is that you are actually right there in the studio with Callas herself.”

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acis

The secret of nymph

Mark Morris’ staging of Acis and Galatea at Lincoln Center is everything good about summer condensed into two hours.

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Paradine Case

Contrariwise

“The dark clouds hovering over Mr. Gelb should not obscure his very real achievements.”

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Euryanthe

Campus radical

“Mr. Burden did his best to wrestle with what looked like a disused Dale Chihuly chandelier, but…”

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Mariella Devia

La regina d’Inghilterra ho veduto cantar

“At Carnegie Hall last Thursday, a capacity crowd witnessed what might be the final official act of a monarch who has reigned for more than four decades.”

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