Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Feldmarschallin: Guten Morgen Camille and Marianne, no flowers yet but I do have a camille about to bloom... 1:44 AM
  • Operngasse: There is a very nice birthday entry for Samuel Ramey on barihunks.com: http://www.bari... 12:29 AM
  • DeepSouthSenior: . . . Greatest DISadvantage . . . 12:02 AM
  • DeepSouthSenior: Ah, La Rondine. Some lovely music, but more dramatically inert than Act I of Parsifal, and... 11:59 PM
  • Camille: haha, I would have been surprised if that Requiem would have worked for anyone, Feldmarschie! How... 11:23 PM
  • Camille: Glyndebourne is one thing, singing it in a big house is another. Didn’t Nina Stemme sing... 11:20 PM
  • Camille: München 2010? It seems like it was so much later than that, that not so much time has elapsed. So... 11:18 PM
  • Camille: o danke wohl!! That explains it. I have that play and started to read it years ago but never did.... 11:16 PM
  • Lohenfal: In the Victor Hugo play, the King is referred to consistently as Don Carlos, even after he becomes... 11:11 PM
  • Lohengrin: That was in München 2010. Scala: JK was Einspringer in the second performance. 10:12 PM

How monarchic was my sprezzatura!

“Yet the evening’s first words, heard in the set-piece Ombra ma fui—like all of Xerxes’ arias sung with monarchic sprezzatura and amoral relish by Stella Doufexis—came unexpectedly in Italian. It was flagrant violation of this house’s fundamental principle, here brushed aside by the cultural capital of the aria and deemed insufficient to sunder the inextricable bonds between the Italian text and Handel’s melody. It was as if the composer and his music, through his advocate Herheim, was holding ground at least at the outset against appropriation of his music by the moderns.”

Oh, what’s not to like in a review like this one?