Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Perhaps someone who is familiar with the vintage of the vehicles can confirm the date. 9:24 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: But it was the norm to dress like that for the opera and it’s definitely the... 9:23 PM
  • baridave: And Baayork Lee. 9:06 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Why in the world would he want to sing Siegmund? Big mistake. 9:03 PM
  • Operngasse: Thanks for this well-written review. Maybe I’ll try to see a performance, although I doubt... 8:54 PM
  • Krunoslav: I think, in their pre-Met salad days, Charles Kullman and William Lewis could have furnished some... 8:46 PM
  • Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin: Fascinating stuff! I dearly regret that I just missed the opportunity to... 7:56 PM
  • Greg.Freed: Huh, well I’m glad Mr. Kosman was more blown away by Haroutounian than I was though... 7:47 PM
  • manou: http://tinyurl.com /nuez4gh 7:37 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Jagde is probably the most All-American looking Cavaradossi ever. Very GQ. 7:31 PM

Equal rites

As with all good myths, certainly all the myths at the heart of Wagner’s operas, the juggling of symbols and archetypes and themes in Parsifal opens the piece to a great variety of interpretations. Many recent productions have twisted things in a way that seemed to strain or defy Wagner’s intricate libretto and lush, meticulous score: gray springtimes in a world beyond nuclear or environmental holocaust, that sort of thing. But the world of Wagner’s tale is, like our own, a world in crisis, on a razor’s edge. That’s bound to resonate with contemporary directors. They then have many options in setting out the workings of the crisis in this fable of a solution to whatever may be broken.   Read more »