Cher Public

  • marshiemarkII: And should not fail to mention the great Winkler, what a powerful and well produced voice he had and in service of so much... 12:55 AM
  • marshiemarkII: I am just back from my fourth Lulu, and Marlis Petersen and Susan Graham are the two greatest singing actresses on earth... 12:52 AM
  • Poison Ivy: I’m going to play devil’s advocate here and say that the darkness of some of Wagners work isn’t something... 12:29 AM
  • Rosemont: Thank you, Batty. This is so informative and well put. (Why don’t R. Strauss, Bruckner, and even LVB get the “Nazi... 12:20 AM
  • Batty Masetto: Lorenzo, I don’t think it’s possible at this point in history to divorce the opera entirely from its aftereffects, however... 12:04 AM
  • danpatter: Since a job transfer uprooted me from the east coast and led me to Houston, the Met HD telecasts have been a godsend, and I am... 11:50 PM
  • Vergin Vezzosa: aulUs,apologies. Must have had Gluck on my mind. 11:48 PM
  • Vergin Vezzosa: Agree with aulis a. and Krunoslav. I think that it is more likely that the tenor from the “brotherly country”... 11:41 PM

Equal rites

As with all good myths, certainly all the myths at the heart of Wagner’s operas, the juggling of symbols and archetypes and themes in Parsifal opens the piece to a great variety of interpretations. Many recent productions have twisted things in a way that seemed to strain or defy Wagner’s intricate libretto and lush, meticulous score: gray springtimes in a world beyond nuclear or environmental holocaust, that sort of thing. But the world of Wagner’s tale is, like our own, a world in crisis, on a razor’s edge. That’s bound to resonate with contemporary directors. They then have many options in setting out the workings of the crisis in this fable of a solution to whatever may be broken.   Read more »