Cher Public

  • DerLeiermann: Soprano lirico fotogenico sounds like a fach a young singer in the Santa Fe Opera apprenticeship program would claim. I love... 2:33 AM
  • Camille: We got hooked by this and are currently in the last part of Act III and yes, you sure do learn a lot, Buster, you are so right!... 10:07 PM
  • Camille: Only referring to either/or of these ladies as the prototypical soprano lirico fotogenico of each other’s respective time... 10:04 PM
  • Krunoslav: ‘ Vogt and Kaufmann were on opposite ends of the spectrum vocally.’ Really? Have you tried Lauritz Melchior, Paul... 9:48 PM
  • mercadante: Not really, Farrar could take an interval cleanly. 9:30 PM
  • kashania: I was referring to her second act hat but both are fabulous, really. 9:07 PM
  • Porgy Amor: No, that is Act One. For the Act Two processional, there is a hat that had never been alive (presumably) that is just as... 9:00 PM
  • rapt: Is this the chapeau in question? http://www.mvdaily .com/articles/2007 /03/lohengrin1.jpg 8:25 PM

Everything is illuminated

Few new operas have received the near-unanimous acclaim that has greeted Written on Skin since its first performance at the 2012 Aix-en-Provence Festival. The subject line of the email I received from Lincoln Center promoting its US stage premiere went so far as to proclaim it “the opera you’ve been waiting for!” The excitedly expectant audience that filled the former New York State Theater Tuesday evening hailed it with a loud and prolonged ovation, but the intensely complex 90-minute work proved easier to admire than to love.   Read more »

Practical magic

Notable purveyor of mayhem and infanticide Medea has lately been missing from the local operatic scene, but Sunday afternoon sections of the recently renovated Alice Tully Hall were singed by Canadian soprano Dominique Labelle’s blazing incarnation of the Greek sorceress during a concert performance of Handel’s neglected early opera Teseo by the Philharmonia Baroque given during its second visit this summer to the Mostly Mozart Festival.  Read more »

A boozy short leave

After 23 years, the Queen of Carthage has finally made it to Manhattan. On Wednesday night, Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival hosted the Mark Morris Dance Group’s acclaimed 1989 production of Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas at the Rose Theater, and Morris who created the double role of Dido and the Sorceress for himself and danced it exclusively for over a decade was there–this time as conductor–with Stephanie Blythe singing the two roles from the pit as she had done last fall in Berkeley.   Read more »