Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • rapt: Wow! Thanks so much for posting this truly illuminating– ;and touching, I think–articl e. 2:12 PM
  • La Valkyrietta: To illustrate the phrase “from the ridiculous to the sublime”. httpv://www.you... 1:41 PM
  • Vittelio Scarpia: Paul Curran, the director who will stage the new “La donna del lago” next year... 1:37 PM
  • La Valkyrietta: Dabrowski, Your question, “Is the Wagner “heavier” and appropriate only for dramatic... 1:32 PM
  • armerjacquino: Not sure ‘crossover&# 8217; is the right word. She performs all kinds of music but her... 1:31 PM
  • Hippolyte: The couple of times I’ve heard Jagde I thought he was monotonously loud and lacking in... 12:22 PM
  • la vociaccia: Correction: That crossover soprano they had playing the British dancer with the halter top... 11:49 AM
  • la vociaccia: I’m not getting involved in that debate right now – It’s too damn nice out.... 11:41 AM
  • laddie: I saw him sing the role in Santa Fe as well; don’t agree that he stole the show (the set... 11:36 AM
  • overstimmelated: What about protesting the fact that singers are amplified at the Met? (They are,... 11:34 AM

The secret of nymph

“Imagine, if you can, sitting in crisply-pressed linen, sipping a perfectly chilled strawberry mojito wafted to your sidewalk table by a ravishing server, as you listen to the murmur of leaves without even the echo of a car radio or a cranky child’s whine to mar the tranquility… and, while you’re at it, throw in a sumptuous sky display as the evening sun sets over the Hudson River. Now set the whole experience to music by Handel, and you’ve got an approximation of Mark Morris’ staging of Acis and Galatea at Lincoln Center. It’s everything good about summer condensed into two hours.” [New York Observer]

Get happy

Lincoln Center hosted two milestones this week: on Wednesday, The Juilliard School produced a gripping production of Handel’s Radamisto incorporating into an opera for the first time its much-heralded original-instrument orchestra Juilliard 415, while the following night saw choreographer Mark Morris’s radiant setting of Handel’s L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato returning to celebrate its 25th anniversary as part of the White Light Festival.   Read more »

A boozy short leave

After 23 years, the Queen of Carthage has finally made it to Manhattan. On Wednesday night, Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival hosted the Mark Morris Dance Group’s acclaimed 1989 production of Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas at the Rose Theater, and Morris who created the double role of Dido and the Sorceress for himself and danced it exclusively for over a decade was there–this time as conductor–with Stephanie Blythe singing the two roles from the pit as she had done last fall in Berkeley.   Read more »