Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Rudolf: @ Poison Ivy Thanks for this posting of a younger Borodina Amneris. Warts and all. Do you know who... 12:38 AM
  • Porgy Amor: Well, this is an opera singer quip that goes back some ways, isn’t it? “The most... 12:36 AM
  • basso profundo: I may be late to this party but I just noticed that Elina Garanca has apparently written a... 12:26 AM
  • Poison Ivy: Poor taste, but … Entertaining to watch, no? 12:23 AM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: That’s beside the point. She’s had a history of attention-hogging. She... 12:19 AM
  • antikitschychick: ROFLMAO OMG Clita you are sooooo bad!! This made me laugh so hard…poor Mr. Giordani.... 12:11 AM
  • Poison Ivy: Yes but when you can sing like this, I say, carry on! httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=G... 12:05 AM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: This basically sums up her whole existence. 11:54 PM
  • Rudolf: @ Gualtier M Mr. Massi IS young and good-looking but I hope he sounded better in the house. From... 11:40 PM
  • Rackon: JEEZ I hate this effing phone sometimes. *Swedish* LOL! 11:24 PM

Juan and two

I always think of Don Giovanni as half of the greatest opera ever written. Or, actually, about 2/3 of the greatest opera ever written. The first act is a masterpiece of the operatic canon. There’s sex, there’s danger, there’s suspense, there’s humor, and there’s absolutely great music. And there’s also a wonderful sense of ambiguity—for instance, what exactly is Don Giovanni doing in Donna Anna’s bedroom? is it a rape, or something else? Is Zerlina really just a naive young thing? “Batti batti bel Masetto” has such an artificial, coy feel to it that you have your doubts. All of these events converge in the suspenseful Act One finale.   Read more »

No business like snow business

Pytor Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin is his masterwork and its themes of social convention and unrequited longing surely struck a deep chord in a composer who, in late 19th century Russia, was gay and had to conduct himself carefully.

I’d like to say a brief requiem for the Metropolitan Opera’s last production, brilliantly designed by Michael Levine and directed by Robert Carsen. Its strong use of color and abstraction brought an easy focus to the unabashed romanticism and melancholy of this work.  Read more »

Tonight or Neva

Last night, the Met opened the 2013-14 season with a handsome, fairly conservative new production of Eugene Onegin by Deborah Warner that replaces the handsome, fairly conservative one by Robert Carsen. (The trend is clear.) The major singers were good, the lesser ones could have been better, the applause at evening’s end was polite and nobody carried on (aside from a brief, pre-opera gay rights demo in the Family Circle). All was serene as the Neva in midwinter between storms. Storms are undesirable to management.   Read more »

snow

There’s no business like snow business

Tonight at long last brings us to our first Met livechat of the season, cher public.

Read more »

new_puritans

Our retrospection will now be all to the future

La Cieca predicts you won’t be seeing any puritans at the Met next season, except of course for the ones who slouch around during intermission hissing, “You call that a trill?”

Read more »

odorama

Scent of mystery

La Cieca has been sniffing around her generally reliable (and fragrant) sources, and she thinks she has pieced together a list of the dozen operas to be featured in the 2013-2014 season of “The Met: Live in HD.”

Read more »

king_roger

Desert fox

Karol Szymanowski’s 1926 King Roger was the sleeper hit of SFO’s season, not so much for its weird, mystical theme and feeble libretto but because the music is powerfully effective.

Read more »

jj_post

Sensational

Juan Diego Flórez made an untraditional Nemorino, his small but diamond-bright tenor unlike the luscious lyric voice usually heard in this part.”

Read more »

Read more »

Passaggio/fail basis

Not only has physical therapy healed Mariusz Kwiecien‘s shapely back, it’s apparently added a third to the top of his range. [New York Times]

Read more »

Read more »

Bringing Mariusz back

Good news, barihunk lovers! According to a press release from the Met, Mariusz Kwiecien will return to the stage for the title role of Don Giovanni on October 25, in time for the HD telecast October 29 as well as remaining scheduled performances through November 11.

Read more »