Cher Public

  • Camille: O! What eagle eyes you have to have swooped down on that one, MastroKruno! NO, am not referring to “Cruising 221;,... 4:06 PM
  • Camille: If there is anyone still considering going upstate to see this Iris, may I offer these two suggestions: listen first to the... 3:39 PM
  • Krunoslav: ” In fact, Mr McKinney’s singing; of which I’ve just heard the fist act” Oh, is it THAT kind of production? Any... 3:12 PM
  • Camille: Jungfer Because a girl’s duenna comes first, I am disobeying the edict to be die schweigsame Frau: (Monsieur Camille is... 2:06 PM
  • Camille: I read a part of TT’s book report summary and do not recall him even mentioning the excellent Kundry. In fact, Mr... 1:58 PM
  • Camille: Bluecabachon– ;I left and then you came in and now you left? So I’m leaving as there is nothing to talk about this... 1:45 PM
  • PCally: The Karajan has Rysanek and Ludwig. Nilsson didn’t add the opera to her rep until the mid-1970s, by which time... 1:11 PM
  • Camille: Following the 1841 Schott republished score of Der Fliegende Holländer, which was the author’s original libretto and which... 1:09 PM

Not nobody, not nohow!

“Mr. Luisi won praise replacing Mr. Levine time after time, particularly in a costly version of Wagner’s Ring cycle—though, perhaps in a sign of the situation’s delicacy, the two conductors have never met in person.” [New York Times]

The double negative has led to proof positive

La Cieca has been mulling over Michael Cooper‘s recent “bizarreNew York Times story about Peter Gelb‘s rationale for the putative departure (or non-departure, as the case may be) of James Levine from the Met, and after a lot of pondering she thinks she has this thing figured out. Inspector, will you ask the guests to gather in the Eleanor Belmont Room?   Read more »

The toothless tiger rules the restless jungle

La Cieca can only go on for so long parsing statements like “So for now Mr. Levine and the Met are watching and waiting to see how he responds to his new regimen. Mr. Levine said that he hopes he is not done yet as music director.” It’s up to you, cher public, to try to decide for yourself what, if anything, this bizarre story in the New York Times means.

Levine.jpg

Eminence grise

Even when he’s not conducting the production, or, for that matter, even after the production is closed, Maestro Levine remains a presence on the Met’s website.  

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Tannhaeuser_Stage

Starry starry night

Although the season is less than three weeks old, Metropolitan Opera audiences may hear nothing else this season as beautiful as Peter Mattei’s “Song to the Evening Star.”

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what gets me

“What gets me…!”

What gets me, La Cieca snaps, is not so much that Levine bit off more than he could chew, because that’s old news.

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Two jobs

The Friday afternoon news dump in excelsis

“Met Music Director James Levine has decided to lighten his workload by removing the new production of Berg’s Lulu from his schedule so that he may focus his energies completely on Wagner’s epic drama Tannhäuser.”

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guest

Be my guest!

James Levine turns 72 this year. Even though his health has improved considerably in the past year and he may continue to conduct for a decade or more, it seems inevitable that he will step down as the Met’s Music Director sometime in the next few years to assume the role of Conductor Laureate.

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Figaro

Ten thousand bedrooms

The Metropolitan Opera desperately needed a new production of Le nozze di Figaro.

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Figaro

Wedding bell blues

“So it’s twice as disappointing that Monday night’s performance of the Mozart masterpiece turned into a four-hour fizzle.”

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