Cher Public

  • mjmacmtenor: Speaking of his upper extension – listen to the note at the end. httpv:// pRAY07k_GE 10:50 PM
  • SilvestriWoman: I’m seeing the same thing at Lyric Opera of Chicago – both in the balcony and the orchestra. In fact, much of... 10:40 PM
  • mrsjohnclaggart: Oh, Benedetta, I was THERE!!!! Cappuccilli was ALWAYS walking away with Eve Quaalude’s shows. You remember the La... 10:38 PM
  • mrsjohnclaggart: Porgy I must own to some annoyance you. You asked me about the Thielemann and Sinopoli Fanciualas last week and I wept... 10:11 PM
  • Amnerees: I last heard Bonisolli in a 1987 Covent Garden Turandot with Gwyneth Jones. He acquitted himself very well. The performance was... 9:59 PM
  • antikitschychick: This was awesome; thanks for sharing it Ed! Can’t believe there isn’t a full video of any of her Normas.... 9:28 PM
  • Benedetta Funghi-Trifolati: The first time I saw Bonisolli (early 1970s) he was Almaviva in BARBIERE DI SIVIGLIA! His repertoire then was... 9:27 PM
  • williams: …not to mention whether to use head or chest. 8:21 PM

Come to the unstable

“How, then, to explain the perplexing performance last Friday night of Falstaff, Mr. Levine’s first new production since his return? Nothing went wrong exactly, but nothing went quite right either. Conducting this final masterpiece of Verdi—a Levine specialty at the Met since 1972, his second season with the company—the maestro was off his game.” [New York Observer] (Photo: Ken Howard)

He is big

Falstaff, Verdi’s final opera, is exuberantly inventive, bubbling and roiling with ideas the 79-year-old composer was too impatient to develop. It’s a work bursting with miraculously youthful vigor, which the newly invigorated James Levine brought to the Metropolitan Opera on December 6. Levine rightfully reveres Falstaff, and his light, deft touch and detailed musical ear were matched in Robert Carsen’s witty, visually stunning production, where Shakespeare’s Merry Wives live in 1950’s Windsor, leaving their bright kitchens to lunch at smart restaurants.   Read more »

‘Twas ever “Thus”

While James Levine’s name might not immediately spring to mind when pondering the great Mozart conductors, he does have a long and distinguished career leading operas by the Austrian master. In fact, Levine had conducted every new production of a Mozart opera at the Met since 1979 until health problems forced him to cancel his participation in Michael Grandage’s dud of a Don Giovanni in October 2011.   Read more »


“If the headline is big enough, it makes the news big enough”

For those of you who might have overlooked the fact that James Levine is conducting tomorrow night at the Met, the New York Times will get you up to speed this morning with no fewer than four (4) features on the return of “somebody who may be the greatest opera conductor in history.”

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Man in chair

The question on everyone’s lips at Carnegie Hall was, “Is Jimmy back in form?”

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Teen spirit

La Cieca thought it would be amusing to do a bit of speculation about what’s to come as we approach the middle of the decade.

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Our retrospection will now be all to the future

La Cieca predicts you won’t be seeing any puritans at the Met next season, except of course for the ones who slouch around during intermission hissing, “You call that a trill?”

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James Levine at the MET

Out of the past

James Levine, the Metropolitan Opera’s Music Director, will return to conducting on May 19, 2013 with the MET Orchestra at Carnegie Hall.

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Scent of mystery

La Cieca has been sniffing around her generally reliable (and fragrant) sources, and she thinks she has pieced together a list of the dozen operas to be featured in the 2013-2014 season of “The Met: Live in HD.”

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James Levine at the MET


Based on reliable reports about reshuffling of the Met’s repertoire for the 2013-14 season, the only reasonable conclusion is that James Levine will never return to conduct with the company.

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