Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Feldmarschallin: Well the top is completely gone and I also hate his personality on stage. Ist mir so was von... 9:00 AM
  • Donna Anna: This opera has even more painful resonance after the latest hostilities in Gaza. The ugly... 8:36 AM
  • 98rsd: You’re being painfully literal. I mean that it’s a term that’s often used to make a... 7:58 AM
  • ML: He was good on Sunday. Can you describe exactly what it is you dislike in him? I don’t enjoy his... 7:41 AM
  • Baltsamic Vinaigrette: DSS, it is one thing not to ‘get’ something that you sampled in the first... 7:34 AM
  • Feldmarschallin: http://www.amazon. de/Kunstst%C3%BCck e-Rolando-Villaz%C 3%B3n-ebook/dp/B00 I2F2NFU/ref=sr... 7:12 AM
  • ML: I’m jealous. Barenboim seems to be on an Elgar kick. I saw a new Elgar 2 from him on disc the other... 6:51 AM
  • Regina delle fate: We can’t escape it over here! But Barenboim and Rattle have been championing it in... 5:25 AM
  • ML: I’d love to hear Gerontius with anyone. It seems to be forgotten. 5:20 AM
  • Regina delle fate: To which you can add, Wozzeck, Lulu (three-act version), Betrothal in a Monastary, The... 5:18 AM

Namenlos in Lieb’ umfangen

SiriusXM is broadcasting right now a 1981 performance of Tristan und Isolde featuring Gwyneth Jones (pictured) and Spas Wenkoff, with James Levine conducting the work that season for the first time in his career. And yet, here’s an operatic mystery: neither Ms. Jones nor Mr. Wenkoff was the casting originally conceived by Mr. Levine for this revival: they joined the cast fairly late in the game. So, who among the cher public can tell us which two familiar Met artists were supposed to sing these roles?

There is something I must do, there is something I must do

Your Own La Cieca has emerged from the tomb semi-retirement to present the 2014 Pubie Awards for outstanding achievement in the field of opera and opera-related entertainment in New York and various points north. You, the public, voted, and your decisions, such as they are, are final.

May she have the envelopes, please? Read more »

Blood types

“The finale of Sweeney Todd left the stage of Avery Fisher Hall littered with corpses, but the evening, for all its flaws, felt vibrantly alive. If only the Met could get similarly revved for its production of Wozzeck. On Thursday night, the opera, whose graphic violence quotient is small potatoes compared to the Sweeney Todd bloodbath, played to a listless half-empty house.” [New York Observer] (Photo: Chris Lee)

Sir John and the horse

Come to the unstable

How, then, to explain the perplexing performance last Friday night of Falstaff, Mr. Levine’s first new production since his return?

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falstaff

He is big

Falstaff, Verdi’s final opera, is exuberantly inventive, bubbling and roiling with ideas the 79-year-old composer was too impatient to develop.

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cosi_3

‘Twas ever “Thus”

While James Levine’s name might not immediately spring to mind when pondering the great Mozart conductors, he does have a long and distinguished career leading operas by the Austrian master.

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furor

“If the headline is big enough, it makes the news big enough”

For those of you who might have overlooked the fact that James Levine is conducting tomorrow night at the Met, the New York Times will get you up to speed this morning with no fewer than four (4) features on the return of “somebody who may be the greatest opera conductor in history.”

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jj_post

Man in chair

The question on everyone’s lips at Carnegie Hall was, “Is Jimmy back in form?”

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saucy

Teen spirit

La Cieca thought it would be amusing to do a bit of speculation about what’s to come as we approach the middle of the decade.

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new_puritans

Our retrospection will now be all to the future

La Cieca predicts you won’t be seeing any puritans at the Met next season, except of course for the ones who slouch around during intermission hissing, “You call that a trill?”

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