Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • armerjacquino: Where did you get that quote from, btw? The only google match I can find is from the... 1:08 PM
  • m. croche: My humble recommendation would be to swap in La Dame blanche occasionally for L’Elisir or La... 1:08 PM
  • armerjacquino: Fun story. He was happy to make a film of it, mind. http://www.amazon. co.uk/La-Forza-... 1:07 PM
  • bronzino: I snooze through the mediocre writing of Act II… 1:01 PM
  • NPW-Paris: More seriously, I enjoyed it at the Opéra Comique in 2012. “Never a dull moment” I... 1:00 PM
  • bronzino: I agree with you that F is pretty far down the list of the maestro’s creations. “The... 12:59 PM
  • NPW-Paris: There’s even a Métro station called “La Muette”. 12:53 PM
  • armerjacquino: Frank Lopardo’s FB page makes interesting reading, especially for those who thought... 12:45 PM
  • Milady DeWinter: Thanks for those fun options coloraturafan! Of course, when Netrebko sings Mimi, no Option... 12:42 PM
  • armerjacquino: ‘realismR 17; v ‘hysteria 217;. Got it. 12:37 PM

There is something I must do, there is something I must do

Your Own La Cieca has emerged from the tomb semi-retirement to present the 2014 Pubie Awards for outstanding achievement in the field of opera and opera-related entertainment in New York and various points north. You, the public, voted, and your decisions, such as they are, are final.

May she have the envelopes, please? Read more »

Blood types

“The finale of Sweeney Todd left the stage of Avery Fisher Hall littered with corpses, but the evening, for all its flaws, felt vibrantly alive. If only the Met could get similarly revved for its production of Wozzeck. On Thursday night, the opera, whose graphic violence quotient is small potatoes compared to the Sweeney Todd bloodbath, played to a listless half-empty house.” [New York Observer] (Photo: Chris Lee)

Come to the unstable

“How, then, to explain the perplexing performance last Friday night of Falstaff, Mr. Levine’s first new production since his return? Nothing went wrong exactly, but nothing went quite right either. Conducting this final masterpiece of Verdi—a Levine specialty at the Met since 1972, his second season with the company—the maestro was off his game.” [New York Observer] (Photo: Ken Howard)

falstaff

He is big

Falstaff, Verdi’s final opera, is exuberantly inventive, bubbling and roiling with ideas the 79-year-old composer was too impatient to develop.

Read more »

cosi_3

‘Twas ever “Thus”

While James Levine’s name might not immediately spring to mind when pondering the great Mozart conductors, he does have a long and distinguished career leading operas by the Austrian master.

Read more »

furor

“If the headline is big enough, it makes the news big enough”

For those of you who might have overlooked the fact that James Levine is conducting tomorrow night at the Met, the New York Times will get you up to speed this morning with no fewer than four (4) features on the return of “somebody who may be the greatest opera conductor in history.”

Read more »

jj_post

Man in chair

The question on everyone’s lips at Carnegie Hall was, “Is Jimmy back in form?”

Read more »

saucy

Teen spirit

La Cieca thought it would be amusing to do a bit of speculation about what’s to come as we approach the middle of the decade.

Read more »

new_puritans

Our retrospection will now be all to the future

La Cieca predicts you won’t be seeing any puritans at the Met next season, except of course for the ones who slouch around during intermission hissing, “You call that a trill?”

Read more »

James Levine at the MET

Out of the past

James Levine, the Metropolitan Opera’s Music Director, will return to conducting on May 19, 2013 with the MET Orchestra at Carnegie Hall.

Read more »