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Cher Public

  • dcrazmo: Satisfied: Why is the review drivel? Because you disagree with it? 12:45 PM
  • antikitschychick: lol what a pesky lot those conductors eh mirywi? :-P.No but seriously, in some cases, if... 12:35 PM
  • Satisfied: Sweet article on RBG today at Politico. http://www.politic o.com/story/2014/1 0/ruth-bader-gi... 12:29 PM
  • redbear: I meant America’s leadership role. If America decided to think like Denmark, for example,... 12:25 PM
  • messa di voce: Guess who: “Ryan Speedo Green, with his husky physique” 12:22 PM
  • operaassport: One word about the protests: FIZZLE! As for the Gelb must go crowd: what an odd mix of people.... 12:17 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: It’s always the West that has to bend over backwards to accommodate anyone... 12:17 PM
  • Kenhere: On the contrary, the opera begins with sympathy for the hijackers, in the Chorus of Exiled... 12:15 PM
  • armerjacquino: America is making a serious mistake by putting themselves as the religious fundamentalis... 12:11 PM
  • LittleMasterMiles: The “more-like-a n-oratorio” criticism has been around forever, as though... 12:05 PM

Her maestro’s voice

Our Own Poison Ivy interviews conductor Alain Altinoglu over at her own blog, Poison Ivy’s Wall of Text. (Photo © Fred Toulet.)

The world on a string: talking to Jamie Barton

American mezzo Jamie Barton, who has steadily been winning fans in the US over the past few years for her rich and nuanced singing, took the international opera world by storm last weekend by winning both the Song Prize as well as the overall prize in the BBC Cardiff Singer of the World competition. Watching her final program of arias from Adriana Lecouvreur, Hansel und Gretel, and Berlioz’s Les Troyens, along with a song by Sibelius, it’s hard to imagine how the international jury that included Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Dame Felicity Palmer, Neil Shicoff and Håkan Hagegård could have chosen anyone else.  Read more »

The Beatrice generation

Beatrice di Tenda was a problem child, Vincenzo Bellini an alternately protective and disparaging parent. If he had lived to write another dozen operas this might not matter, but this work of 1833 was his penultimate piece; two and a half years later, the young Sicilian was dead, not yet 34.

The melodies of Beatrice thus come from the same rare and gorgeous fount as do those of Norma and Puritani, and if you love her sisters, you should certainly save a date for Beatrice. Her next big date in this neck of the woods comes tomorrow night, when the Collegiate Chorale and the American Symphony Orchestra present the opera at Carnegie Hall. Read more »

grooving

Transparency

Opera Teen (pictured, second from left) is not kidding us: he had an interview with Peter Gelb.

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ballo_alden

The man behind the mask

Recently your doyenne engaged in an email-based interview with David Alden, director of the Met’s new production of Un ballo in maschera, opening on Thursday.

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Wunderkinder in mirror are larger than they appear

Composer Nico Muhly took a break between operatic world premieres to order a daiquiri and talk to our own JJ about height, haters and flight path. [Capital New York] (Photo: Peter Ross)

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Anna, in her own words

I was on the bus to Nürnberg today on the way to do Wagner tourism and hear Herr Sacro Fuoco tomorrow, and on the way I translated the juicy bits of the full print edition Anna Netrebko article… I was going to post it as a comment but it turns out I thought a lot of it was interesting (and touches on many of the points that have come up in the comments to the excerpt!) and it ended up long. So here is a translation minus the parts that were already posted and some parts I thought weren’t that [...]

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A great maestro gives an interview

Though Margaret Juntwait may have caught him pitifully unprepared, James Levine did say a few words for those lovely people among the Sirius audience last night during the intermission of Ariadne. Those of you who missed this singular event may want to take a peek after the jump.

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A water, bird talk

Our own JJ “sits down” (figuratively speaking) with Robert Lepage to “talk” (also figuratively speaking) about his production of The Nightingale and Other Short Fables, opening tomorrow night at BAM. [New York Post]

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Scotto talks

Parterre’s tutelary diva shares espresso and cookies with parterre’s fave scribe Zachary Woolfe in preparation for the gala Met Legends event honoring her next Sunday.

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