Cher Public

Why Rupert Christiansen is the wrong commentator about gay rights protesters

The veteran British critic click-whored, “[B]ased on the possibly paranoid notion that the two men are as thick as thieves, Gergiev is being systematically harassed and hounded before performances in both New York and London by campaigners who feel that his silence on the gay issue indicates his tacit support for his chum in the Kremlin.”

Queer canard

“That [Tchaikovsky] committed suicide cannot be doubted, but what precipitated this suicide has not been conclusively established…. Two days later the composer was mortally ill, almost certainly from arsenic poisoning. The story that he died of cholera from drinking unboiled water is pure fabrication.” (Debunked here.)

Wack on Wacker

The announcement of the 2013-2014 season at Lyric Opera of Chicago is not good news at all. Read more »

Update on great operatic scandals of the 20th century

Noted junk sculptor Dr. Jonathan Miller is now the subject of a biography and it appears he’s mellowed in his old age.

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Provocative ad provokes, surprisingly

But not everyone is amused.

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Decrease your word power

La Cieca is starting a new series of Words Critics Need to Stop Using.

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All things Brit and beautiful

“Time and tide wait for no one” pontificates Myrtle the barmaid, setting the tone for André Previn’s opera about fleeting romance but enduring love:  Brief Encounter.  Loosely based on the play Still Life by Noël Coward and the screenplay for the film Brief Encounter by Coward and David Lean, this opera (now on CD) tells a similar story to all of its operatic predecessors:  longing, love and loss. 

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Brittania rule the lake

Houston Grand Opera’s Brit-in-Chief Anthony Freud will take an early departure of his post (recently extended to 2015) to move into the power vacuum created by the departure of William Mason from Lyric Opera of Chicago in 2012, says Culturemap Houston.

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Today in corrections

“A profile of Richard Eyre – ‘All good actors are quick-witted’, 27 November, page 12, Review – mentioned the theatre director’s recollection of having played one of the Three Little Maids in a school production of The Pirates of Penzance. Clarification has since come from the interviewee that in Pirates he played Kate, one of four maids, the daughters of Major-General Stanley (the Three Little Maids, for their part, belong to The Mikado).” [The Guardian]

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The return of Glimmertrash

Given the choice, I’ll take Hans Neuenfels.

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