Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • steveac10: This is what’s being lost. If this were Renee and Nathan last week, Parterre would be giving... 2:19 AM
  • ianw2: but saddling him with a shit staging built around incompetent big names and convincing him never to... 1:54 AM
  • ML: … but saddling him with a shit staging built around incompetent big names and convincing him never... 1:40 AM
  • ML: The subject, after the “as a tenured professor” clause, is SANDOW, not m. croche or... 1:34 AM
  • Constantine A. Papas: So did I, except for Grigolo. 12:31 AM
  • Clita del Toro: I watched about half of The Requiem as I didn’t know it was on. I did enjoy it. 12:04 AM
  • 98rsd: Am I missing some key fact? Is there a reason an orchestra member SHOULD be paid more “than,... 12:00 AM
  • steveac10: Who said anything about outsourcing? I said there are innumerable qualified applicants for that... 11:56 PM
  • Constantine A. Papas: To change the subject: did anyone watch Verdi’s Requiem with LA Philharmonic on... 11:56 PM
  • steveac10: I said nothing about glamour. I also think you are underestimating the pool of talent that would... 11:48 PM

Sticks and stones

Here’s a story in which practically nobody in authority comes off well. Daniel Harding conducts a concert at La Scala that includes a selection from Tristan und Isolde, about which the Corriere della Sera‘s venerable critic Paolo Isotta snipes “Harding’s conducting was so soft it made you think he wanted to back the unfounded theory that Wagner was homosexual.” So then La Scala’s GM Stéphane Lissner kicks Isotta off the press list for the company: he can still review Scala events but will have to pay for his own ticket. [The Telegraph]

She said, he said

So Placido Domingo was all like, “Oh, that Anne Midgette is just a mean girl and she is SO JELLUS,” and then Anne was like, “Actually, nuh-uh, maestro, I’m so not.”

or as we used to call it, “tuesday”

From Franco Corelli: Prince of Tenors:

The battle between tenor and conductor reached a climax when Cillario denied Franco his ovation at the end of “E lucevan le stelle.” An infuriated Corelli flipped his overlong thumb to his teeth in disgust and ran offstage. The audience was left stunned, the orchestra still playing the ascending scale leading to Tosca’s entrance, and Tosca herself bursting on stage to find it empty and the audience buzzing around in a mini uproar. Backstage, Chapin saw Corelli screaming at Charlie Riecker, teeth clenched, eyes bulging. There was no time for discussion. Chapin grabbed Corelli and pushed him back on the stage, where he resumed his role.

Ah! Franchigia a Floria Tosca