Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Dabrowski: I submit for your discussion: Has John Podhoretz written a dumb column about The Death of... 11:05 PM
  • operaassport: The JFK murder is not a good comparison as there are dozens of examples of the Kennedy family... 10:38 PM
  • operaassport: *isnt. 10:34 PM
  • operaassport: While I don’t buy that as an excuse, if you seriously think that anti-Semitism in Europe... 10:33 PM
  • operaassport: I can’t believe that anyone at the MET thought there would be bomb threats at theaters . 10:31 PM
  • Kenhere: I can hardly improve on what Said or Dabrowski wrote, but I think the opening chorus avoids the... 10:16 PM
  • Poison Ivy: The Post article struck me as a rather newbie reaction to the opera. Despite the heavy protesting... 9:41 PM
  • Poison Ivy: My dislike of the opening chorus was its own sense of self-importance. It’s the only part... 9:39 PM
  • philomel: I’d have to agree,the Post article struck me as ignorant. 9:29 PM
  • m. croche: Which may be the worst-ever set-up line for a “three guys walk into a bar” joke. 9:28 PM

Sticks and stones

Here’s a story in which practically nobody in authority comes off well. Daniel Harding conducts a concert at La Scala that includes a selection from Tristan und Isolde, about which the Corriere della Sera‘s venerable critic Paolo Isotta snipes “Harding’s conducting was so soft it made you think he wanted to back the unfounded theory that Wagner was homosexual.” So then La Scala’s GM Stéphane Lissner kicks Isotta off the press list for the company: he can still review Scala events but will have to pay for his own ticket. [The Telegraph]

She said, he said

So Placido Domingo was all like, “Oh, that Anne Midgette is just a mean girl and she is SO JELLUS,” and then Anne was like, “Actually, nuh-uh, maestro, I’m so not.”

or as we used to call it, “tuesday”

From Franco Corelli: Prince of Tenors:

The battle between tenor and conductor reached a climax when Cillario denied Franco his ovation at the end of “E lucevan le stelle.” An infuriated Corelli flipped his overlong thumb to his teeth in disgust and ran offstage. The audience was left stunned, the orchestra still playing the ascending scale leading to Tosca’s entrance, and Tosca herself bursting on stage to find it empty and the audience buzzing around in a mini uproar. Backstage, Chapin saw Corelli screaming at Charlie Riecker, teeth clenched, eyes bulging. There was no time for discussion. Chapin grabbed Corelli and pushed him back on the stage, where he resumed his role.

Ah! Franchigia a Floria Tosca