Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Krunoslav: “not that many Marzellines have moved up to Fidelio” Only Met example: Metropolitan... 1:23 AM
  • Dabrowski: This is an illuminating discussion. Thanks, all! Pavarotti died with a fortune of 250 million... 12:45 AM
  • La Cieca: I’ll try to explain myself once, and then I’ll leave it. I’ve used that word... 12:34 AM
  • antikitschychick: LOL hurrah for you Porgy! :-). Also, Queen DiDo is a kewl name. 12:28 AM
  • laddie: OPERA CAKE – I cannot find my recording of that Hoffman; if anyone has any clues where I can... 12:25 AM
  • antikitschychick: “Or you could, on the other hand, do the constructive thing of comparing her to a... 12:24 AM
  • laddie: yes, and I listened to that Onegin broadcast very closely and no matter what’s in the head,... 12:22 AM
  • antikitschychick: that’s a great anecdote mjmacmtenor. It’s great to hear this person got... 12:10 AM
  • antikitschychick: you’re welcome Le_Chiffre and I echo your sentiments as well :-). 12:07 AM
  • antikitschychick: I would have thought she makes at least 20k per performance. She and others certainly... 11:59 PM

Sticks and stones

Here’s a story in which practically nobody in authority comes off well. Daniel Harding conducts a concert at La Scala that includes a selection from Tristan und Isolde, about which the Corriere della Sera‘s venerable critic Paolo Isotta snipes “Harding’s conducting was so soft it made you think he wanted to back the unfounded theory that Wagner was homosexual.” So then La Scala’s GM Stéphane Lissner kicks Isotta off the press list for the company: he can still review Scala events but will have to pay for his own ticket. [The Telegraph]

She said, he said

So Placido Domingo was all like, “Oh, that Anne Midgette is just a mean girl and she is SO JELLUS,” and then Anne was like, “Actually, nuh-uh, maestro, I’m so not.”

or as we used to call it, “tuesday”

From Franco Corelli: Prince of Tenors:

The battle between tenor and conductor reached a climax when Cillario denied Franco his ovation at the end of “E lucevan le stelle.” An infuriated Corelli flipped his overlong thumb to his teeth in disgust and ran offstage. The audience was left stunned, the orchestra still playing the ascending scale leading to Tosca’s entrance, and Tosca herself bursting on stage to find it empty and the audience buzzing around in a mini uproar. Backstage, Chapin saw Corelli screaming at Charlie Riecker, teeth clenched, eyes bulging. There was no time for discussion. Chapin grabbed Corelli and pushed him back on the stage, where he resumed his role.

Ah! Franchigia a Floria Tosca