Cher Public

Tales of the Bavarian baloney pony

In November, everyone wanted to hear more about Jonas Kaufmann‘s Johnson. The top parterre stories of last month follow the jump.  Read more »

Final curtain

Weeks ago the world was saddened but not surprised at the “news” that Dmitri Hvorostovsky had died. When it turned out that many usually reliable news sources had erroneously reported it, we all rejoiced. Unfortunately today we have learned—and it’s been reliably confirmed—that the magnetic Russian baritone has succumbed to the brain cancer that he had fought so bravely the past few years. “Trove Thursday” pays tribute to Hrovostovsky by presenting a broadcast of his final new role, Rubinstein’s The Demon.  Read more »

RIP Dmitri Hvorostovsky

The heartbreaking news of the death of Dmitri Hvorostovsky has been confirmed by the baritone’s press representative 21C Media.  Read more »

Dmitri Hvorostovsky is alive, his wife assures us

Florence Hvorostovsky has just posted to her Facebook page that the Russian news site reporting her husband’s death is mistaken.

Read more »

Again with the Mad Libs

La Cieca literally cannot even.

Read more »

Hvorostovsky out of Met ‘Onegin’

Dmitri Hvorostovsky has withdrawn from his upcoming opera engagements, including this spring’s Met performances as the title character in Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, due to illness.

Read more »

Nakonets! Ruka zavershena yeshche raz!

Now this is a piece of (imaginary) casting so obvious you have to wonder if it hasn’t already happened and we missed it.

Read more »

Dark of the moon

“Dmitri Hvorostovsky has withdrawn from his upcoming performances of Verdi’s Il Trovatore—February 3, 6, 9, and 13 matinee—due to his ongoing treatment for a brain tumor. Juan Jesús Rodríguez will sing di Luna in these performances, making his Met debut.” So says the Met press office.

Read more »

Artist’s name spelled correctly

Dmitri Hvorostovsky, Brain Tumor Gone and Cancer-Free, to Sing at Helikon Opera in November,” reads the headline.

Read more »

Man of steel

“This throwback to the golden age of opera—superhuman singing greeted with frenzied ovations—was a function of a perfect storm of excitement.”

Read more »