Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • tancredipasero: great typo, thanks!! I am pretty sure you meant “non-photoge nic” – the... 12:46 AM
  • Batty Masetto: From an entirely different source, I came across this video of Klinghoffer protesters walking... 12:14 AM
  • Dabrowski: I submit for your discussion: Has John Podhoretz written a dumb column about The Death of... 11:05 PM
  • operaassport: The JFK murder is not a good comparison as there are dozens of examples of the Kennedy family... 10:38 PM
  • operaassport: *isnt. 10:34 PM
  • operaassport: While I don’t buy that as an excuse, if you seriously think that anti-Semitism in Europe... 10:33 PM
  • operaassport: I can’t believe that anyone at the MET thought there would be bomb threats at theaters . 10:31 PM
  • Kenhere: I can hardly improve on what Said or Dabrowski wrote, but I think the opening chorus avoids the... 10:16 PM
  • Poison Ivy: The Post article struck me as a rather newbie reaction to the opera. Despite the heavy protesting... 9:41 PM
  • Poison Ivy: My dislike of the opening chorus was its own sense of self-importance. It’s the only part... 9:39 PM

“Oh how I sympathize with King Canute!”

Norman Lebrecht, who seems now to have no goal in life beyond actively impeding the progress of classical music—and why not: look how cruelly the industry has treated him!—has published a “review” from a “critic” who walked out of a three-act opera after the first act.

Sticks and stones

Here’s a story in which practically nobody in authority comes off well. Daniel Harding conducts a concert at La Scala that includes a selection from Tristan und Isolde, about which the Corriere della Sera‘s venerable critic Paolo Isotta snipes “Harding’s conducting was so soft it made you think he wanted to back the unfounded theory that Wagner was homosexual.” So then La Scala’s GM Stéphane Lissner kicks Isotta off the press list for the company: he can still review Scala events but will have to pay for his own ticket. [The Telegraph]

Her bark and her bite

Anna Bolena… opened at the Metropolitan Opera on Monday in a new production featuring Anna Netrebko and two handsome Irish wolfhounds who helped us get through one very tedious scene.” (Bloomberg News, Manuela Hoelterhoff) Read more »