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  • zinka: Sorry to hear,even from friends NOT prejudiced against the wonderful SQUILLO of Marcello(people call... 9:47 PM
  • Poison Ivy: Guys I found this gem from nearly 20 years ago of Olga Borodina’s Amneris. Look at that... 9:37 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: Palombi was the substitute when Alagna threw a hissy fit at La Scala. 7:41 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: Maybe it’s changed. Domingo’s anecdote was from 1971. 7:39 PM
  • MontyNostry: antikk is right about the Macbeth at Covent Garden – she looked rather glamorous, but so... 7:32 PM
  • antikitschychick: Lmaoooo now that is funny Pavel! I think she looks like a combination of Montsy and... 7:10 PM
  • antikitschychick: Quanto: I highly doubt that’s true given her busy schedule…may be a few years... 7:01 PM
  • MontyNostry: I’ve said this on here before – it’s a shame that an intelligent woman with... 6:54 PM
  • antikitschychick: Ivy, this is an interesting observation but I don’t necessarily agree because, while... 6:54 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Rumor has it that she will begin or is already involved in having a teaching career! 6:54 PM

Play your hunch

Bel Canto at Caramoor is something that I’ve always wanted to attend but never have because … well because frankly I’m just too lazy during the summers, and I’m also a big baby about outdoor performances. What if it’s torrential downpour? What if it’s 100 degrees? What if it’s a five hour opera and it sucks and there’s no way of peacing out? What if the cast sucks? I’d rather focus on the three big B’s during the summer: Ballet, Beach, and Big Brother. Read more »

The curse of drink

Two operas both alike in dignity, set in dimly lit Renaissance towns ruled by seething, conspiratorial courts. Parties blaze, alleyway shadows threaten, half the characters are spies or bravos for the other half, plus a few on spec. Love is in short supply, usually twisted. What these folks need is a competent social worker with a dagger-proof vest and a cast-iron stomach. What they get is melody to live upon and die upon, melody as rich and various as the forms of pasta.   Read more »

Eschorcher

Jennifer LarmoreGiuseppe and I have always had a complicated relationship. I could live without ever hearing Aïda again, and although I love Il Trovatore I can’t get too excited about either Rigoletto or La Traviata. Much as I admire Otello and Falstaff, instead Macbeth is the Shakespeare opera I couldn’t live without. A great Ernani thrills me in a way that no Un Ballo in Maschera ever has and while every encore of “Va, pensiero” makes me want to run to the nearest exit, the final act of Luisa Miller reigns as one of the greatest in all opera. But, for me, Verdi has always meant above all Don Carlos, his greatest, most complex, most moving work. Read more »

vesper

Les vêpres de Westchester

The big news from Bel Canto at Caramoor’s presentation of Les Vêpres Siciliennes last Saturday is far from unexpected.

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ruins

While you waste these precious hours

It has come to La Cieca’s attention that the New York Opera Calendar is sadly devoid of content until Saturday of this week.

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boulevard

All boulevards lead to Westchester

“Let’s go up to Westchester!”

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ah_paris

New York has neon, Berlin has bars, but ah! Caramoor!

This summer at Caramoor, Will Crutchfield (not pictured) will conduct two Verdi operas written for the Académie Royale de Musique.

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capuleti_caramoor

Thirds and music

Richard Wagner told Cosima he first got the idea of composing an opera about Tristan and Isolde while he was conducting Bellini’s I Capuleti e i Montecchi starring his muse, Wilhelmine Schröder-Devrient, in the trouser role of Romeo.

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jj_scream

JJ au naturel

Our Own JJ has been spending a lot of time outdoors lately, which is such a novelty for him that he felt he really must write about it.

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Ciro in Babilonia by Rossini, a Bel Canto at Caramoor performance

Conquering Ciro

By the time Rossini was 20, he had produced six operas, most of them brief, comic and slight. He admitted to admiring Mozart (not then well known south of the Alps), but the melodies of his early works show more of the influence of Paisiello.

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