Cher Public

  • SilvestriWoman: Second that… Only weeks ago, I saw Corbelli here in Lyric’s Cenerentola, and he blew me away. His voice was... 11:17 PM
  • Camille: Beautiful voice, technique, intonation, musicality, and singing. Thank you for introducing me to this particular piece as I am... 10:09 PM
  • Batty Masetto: Oy, but some of those farkakte shmattes they put on the ladies these days! 9:58 PM
  • Camille: Alagna will be singing Éléazar in Feldmarschallin 217;s backyard, in München next June. I remember noting that it will be... 9:46 PM
  • Camille: Thank you again so kindly and now I shall make a point of it. His terrible suicide becomes a bit more clear as, for a writer, the... 9:28 PM
  • Camille: So relieved to hear you are home safely and are not still levitating over Josie Robertson Plaza in extasi! You don’t know... 9:22 PM
  • LT: Tomorrow(Sunday)th e traditional Advenskonzert from Dresden will take place with Sonya Yoncheva and Luca Pisaroni. It will be... 8:52 PM
  • antikitschychick: Just got back from the matinee of Tosca and omfg I died. I.AM.DEAD. Morta I tell you! It was riveting. When Tosca jumped... 8:52 PM

High notes on camp

“In naïve, or pure, Camp, the essential element is seriousness, a seriousness that fails. Of course, not all seriousness that fails can be redeemed as Camp. Only that which has the proper mixture of the exaggerated, the fantastic, the passionate, and the naïve.” (Susan Sontag)   Read more »

The bough friend

The Deutsche Opera an Rhein production of Handel’s Xerxes (which is shared with the Berlin Komische Oper), though I saw it three nights ago, has taken a while to settle down in my brain. That’s not because the Stefan Herheim production is particularly abstruse but rather, on the contrary, because at least at first viewing it seemed relatively straightforward. On the night, I was a little disappointed because I expected something more challenging. Read more »

Drop dead diva

My first experience with John Corigliano’s music was in high school with the ear and mind blowing score he wrote for Ken Russell’s film Altered States. It was nominated for an Academy Award that year alongside John Williams’ orchestral battalions for The Empire Strikes Back, the gentle humanity John Morris brought to The Elephant Man and Phillipe Sarde’s high romance for Tess. All were estimable examples in their own genres, and yet the brass ring that year went to Michael Gore’s disco gyrations for Fame. Sometimes, considering the company, the greater honor is to stand next to those passed over.   Read more »


Top hatters

Christopher Alden‘s production of Handel’s Partenope is so erudite and theatrically audacious and also such a rollicking ride, it’s hard to believe it isn’t crap.

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Fish are jumping and the dudgeon is high

“Quaint camp, says Rupert Christiansen.”

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Queen of the Maybe

“I didn’t think anything could be campier than Adriana. But this is nothing but camp. Adriana at least has tunes.”

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The V.I.P.s

Your doyenne La Cieca (not pictured) invites you to our weekly discussion of off-topic and general interest subjects.

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O Caftan! My Caftan!

Unconcealed by the voluminous folds of this Jessyesqe muumuu is queen-sized talent Jeffery Roberson (also known as Varla Jean Merman.)

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Fair, game

The Monday, 12th December, Weill Hall recital debut of Signora Chiara Taigi, a strikingly good looking Italian soprano, who had made her American operatic debut this past March, starring as Selika in the OONY production of Meyerbeer’s long-neglected L’Africaine, was something Your Own Camille had looked forward to with a high hopes and a faintly wondering glee, for several months now.  

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The recursion of kitsch

Like the double or triple negative (where theoretically pairs of “nots” cancel each other out, but in practice you can’t be so sure) this tidbit of news La Cieca just read has her confused and uncertain. It seems that at a recital in Tulsa last night, Dame Kiri te Kanawa sang as an encore a Jake Heggie setting of Maria Callas‘s final monologue from Terrence McNally‘s Master Class. You know, the one that McNally didn’t actually write but rather collated from some random remarks Callas made in an entirely different emotional context.

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