Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Feldmarschallin: People need to lighten up a bit here. Everything gets taken so seriously. Kruno has a... 1:43 PM
  • moi: 1:37 PM
  • Buster: Haitink conducts the Four Last Songs. He conducted so many singers in this (Janowitz, Söderström,... 1:04 PM
  • messa di voce: Agree about A-L. Every technical challenge is met, but the basic sound of the voice is just... 12:57 PM
  • antikitschychick: Yay looking forward to your report Lohengrin :-). Fidelia: I will! Probably after I finish... 12:50 PM
  • Fidelia: P.S. To Lohengrin, greetings to the charming older lady with the white hair whom we also met on... 12:43 PM
  • Fidelia: Lohengrin, I just sent you an SMS with my e-mail address. Let me know here if you don’t get... 12:42 PM
  • kennedet: Sorry, but this is a combination of ingratitude and arrogance, Krunoslav. Should Cieca have... 12:41 PM
  • luvtennis: I have heard the following live performances of the aria by Price: 1957 – San Francisco... 12:37 PM
  • Lohengrin: Fidelia, could it be possible to contact You outside parterre.com? 12:32 PM

Bows and arias

Whenever opera-lovers are canvassed about what neglected operas they hunger to see revived, the resulting lists inevitably feature a goodly number of grand operas, those once wildly popular monstrosities–particularly by Meyerbeer–written primarily for Paris in the mid-19th century. Yet despite the enthusiasm of their advocates, these works have had a hard time regaining a place in the repertoire in the 21st century. Although a recent revival of Auber’s La Muette de Portici was well received at the Opéra-Comique in Paris, Covent Garden’s splashy new Robert le Diable by Meyerbeer flopped and the Met has never revived its 2003 production of Halévy’s La JuiveRead more »

The curse of drink

Two operas both alike in dignity, set in dimly lit Renaissance towns ruled by seething, conspiratorial courts. Parties blaze, alleyway shadows threaten, half the characters are spies or bravos for the other half, plus a few on spec. Love is in short supply, usually twisted. What these folks need is a competent social worker with a dagger-proof vest and a cast-iron stomach. What they get is melody to live upon and die upon, melody as rich and various as the forms of pasta.   Read more »

You don’t have to be Druids to love it

“The Met’s production, originally directed by John Copley, is still a hideous, confusing mess. But with Ms. Meade and Ms. Barton acting with moving subtlety, singing generously and feeling deeply, it was hard to care.” [New York Times]

captain_future

We’ll settle that tonight!

La Cieca has been wining, dining and otherwise wooing her Met connection (pictured above) and he (or is it she?) has come across with some tidbits about upcoming seasons at Casa Gelb.

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vesper

Les vêpres de Westchester

The big news from Bel Canto at Caramoor’s presentation of Les Vêpres Siciliennes last Saturday is far from unexpected.

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angela_meade

Ed io quest’Angela osava maledir!

Angela Meade will sing the role of Leonora in tomorrow afternoon’s performance of Verdi’s Il Trovatore, replacing Patricia Racette, who is ill.

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ah_paris

New York has neon, Berlin has bars, but ah! Caramoor!

This summer at Caramoor, Will Crutchfield (not pictured) will conduct two Verdi operas written for the Académie Royale de Musique.

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meade_beatrice

Bea in the bonnet

Everyone who revives Bellini’s Beatrice di Tenda, as the Collegiate Chorale did at Carnegie Hall on Wednesday night, calls the piece an “overlooked masterpiece.”

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michael_spyres

The Beatrice generation

Beatrice di Tenda was a problem child, Vincenzo Bellini an alternately protective and disparaging parent.

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Who has more justification to wear a wifebeater?

Half full

Opera Orchestra of New York has announced their 2012-2013 season of only two performances.

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