Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Bill: PCally – as far as I understood it Zefferelli sometimes concentrated more on the extras (young... 11:08 AM
  • RosinaLeckermaul: I saw a TOSCA at the Deutsche Oper in Berlin a few weeks ago that was as traditional as... 11:05 AM
  • Porgy Amor: The Schenk Rusalka has had its last showing at the Met, though, hasn’t it? I had read... 11:04 AM
  • La Cieca: I would say it’s more a matter of the colors of the set fading, eventually to a sort of... 10:40 AM
  • turings: Sure – I just think any revival needs a good director and reasonable rehearsal time. There’s... 10:38 AM
  • DeepSouthSenior: After a few days absent from Parterre, I’m glad that I visited this discussion first.... 10:37 AM
  • PCally: Your comment only highlights the problem with classic productions. La Cieca say that “the... 10:14 AM
  • PCally: Your first statement was that Tosca was not “very 1980s au contraire, it replicates the Rome of June... 10:09 AM
  • Ilka Saro: I agree with Hans Lick here. But to me, the point isn’t about audibility, but about scale.... 9:45 AM
  • Bill: Hippolyte – I agree with you. I never have had trouble hearing any singer in the new Met no... 8:18 AM

How monarchic was my sprezzatura!

“Yet the evening’s first words, heard in the set-piece Ombra ma fui—like all of Xerxes’ arias sung with monarchic sprezzatura and amoral relish by Stella Doufexis—came unexpectedly in Italian. It was flagrant violation of this house’s fundamental principle, here brushed aside by the cultural capital of the aria and deemed insufficient to sunder the inextricable bonds between the Italian text and Handel’s melody. It was as if the composer and his music, through his advocate Herheim, was holding ground at least at the outset against appropriation of his music by the moderns.”

Oh, what’s not to like in a review like this one?