Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • operaassport: I saw it in the house and it was extremely loud. Methinks DG had good engineers. It was a... 1:24 PM
  • Gualtier M: Another rave for Fleming: http://www.berkshi refinearts.com/07- 20-2014_living-... 1:19 PM
  • DellaCasaFan: Jurinac is definitely #7, but I got Rysanek wrong for #3. I don’t think there is a... 1:18 PM
  • la vociaccia: Glad we agree about that Ariel. I tried, believe me I tried, to see why everyone thought it was... 1:16 PM
  • kashania: My friend Robert Gleadow stepped in. Anyone hear how he sounded? 1:16 PM
  • John L: Nice review. It is interesting that Strauss wanted the orchestra held back and a more subtle... 1:08 PM
  • Doctor Octavian: Thanks for the great review, Patrick. I’m one of those who regularly crank up the... 12:53 PM
  • Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin: It was, indeed, Daniele Gatti: I was there. I found him extremely uneven,... 12:50 PM
  • m. croche: Oops! Not the first time I’ve made an ass out of myself, nor will it be the last. My... 12:48 PM
  • armerjacquino: Yes, I was. 12:46 PM

How monarchic was my sprezzatura!

“Yet the evening’s first words, heard in the set-piece Ombra ma fui—like all of Xerxes’ arias sung with monarchic sprezzatura and amoral relish by Stella Doufexis—came unexpectedly in Italian. It was flagrant violation of this house’s fundamental principle, here brushed aside by the cultural capital of the aria and deemed insufficient to sunder the inextricable bonds between the Italian text and Handel’s melody. It was as if the composer and his music, through his advocate Herheim, was holding ground at least at the outset against appropriation of his music by the moderns.”

Oh, what’s not to like in a review like this one?