Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Cicciabella: Thanks, Marianne, for pointing out this marvellous recording. Berry is so seductive, sad and... 7:02 AM
  • PushedUpMezzo: Rupert of course! 5:40 AM
  • PushedUpMezzo: http://www.telegra ph.co.uk/culture/m usic/opera/1136587 4/ENOs-spring-and- summer-seasons-... 5:39 AM
  • redbear: Can’t believe the Met security! Next you’ll be telling me that someone jumped over the... 5:34 AM
  • operadunce: They probably didn’t do much waltzing down on the farm in Pontevedro. :) 4:14 AM
  • Cicciabella: Brilliant, m.croche! I wonder how many critics actually look at the score before they write a... 4:08 AM
  • m. croche: The fairly strict, unvarying meter does indeed create a distancing effect – a big step away... 2:48 AM
  • zinka: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=2SZs xTBCzoA ATTENZIONE!!!! Today Anna and Piotr called La Cieca and... 2:18 AM
  • La Cieca: I may be wrong about this as I have no Hungarian at all, but the use of this meter with its... 2:10 AM
  • zinka: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=mn0T fE1Hewc O must be losing it!!! Here I am thinking of... 1:57 AM

How monarchic was my sprezzatura!

“Yet the evening’s first words, heard in the set-piece Ombra ma fui—like all of Xerxes’ arias sung with monarchic sprezzatura and amoral relish by Stella Doufexis—came unexpectedly in Italian. It was flagrant violation of this house’s fundamental principle, here brushed aside by the cultural capital of the aria and deemed insufficient to sunder the inextricable bonds between the Italian text and Handel’s melody. It was as if the composer and his music, through his advocate Herheim, was holding ground at least at the outset against appropriation of his music by the moderns.”

Oh, what’s not to like in a review like this one?