Headshot of La Cieca

The Met: A Three-Part Series

Cher Public

  • Flora del Rio Grande: A certain Alabama soprano who sings Musetta? I do detect some vocal stress there now... 1:25 AM
  • Flora del Rio Grande: Zinka: I am surprised that nobody has mentioned Dorothy Kirsten in discussions of... 1:22 AM
  • Krunoslav: To me, Antonacci has Kunst and can sing beautifully as to line and feeling, but does not qualify... 12:40 AM
  • Krunoslav: “I still say the ONLY Stimm/Kunst successful diva..gorgeous voice and remarkable emotion is... 12:34 AM
  • Cara Speme: Dear Dylan, I am in Puritanical heaven, Thanks for an embarrassment of riches. (And the best... 12:20 AM
  • Cara Speme: Dear Dylan, I am in Puritanical heaven, Thanks for an embarrassment of riches. (And the best... 12:20 AM
  • bluecabochon: It worked, thanks! What happened to start this off? 11:33 PM
  • lyrebird: Ooops. Sincere Apologies. That was one I’d been watching (Bonynge nearly tripping over... 11:17 PM
  • lyrebird: Big Coloraturafan fan here; thanks Dylan. For anyone looking for some immediacy and intimacy (not... 11:07 PM
  • Camille: Thanks. It has been continual for two days now 10:25 PM

How monarchic was my sprezzatura!

“Yet the evening’s first words, heard in the set-piece Ombra ma fui—like all of Xerxes’ arias sung with monarchic sprezzatura and amoral relish by Stella Doufexis—came unexpectedly in Italian. It was flagrant violation of this house’s fundamental principle, here brushed aside by the cultural capital of the aria and deemed insufficient to sunder the inextricable bonds between the Italian text and Handel’s melody. It was as if the composer and his music, through his advocate Herheim, was holding ground at least at the outset against appropriation of his music by the moderns.”

Oh, what’s not to like in a review like this one?