Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • dcrazmo: Satisfied: Why is the review drivel? Because you disagree with it? 12:45 PM
  • antikitschychick: lol what a pesky lot those conductors eh mirywi? :-P.No but seriously, in some cases, if... 12:35 PM
  • Satisfied: Sweet article on RBG today at Politico. http://www.politic o.com/story/2014/1 0/ruth-bader-gi... 12:29 PM
  • redbear: I meant America’s leadership role. If America decided to think like Denmark, for example,... 12:25 PM
  • messa di voce: Guess who: “Ryan Speedo Green, with his husky physique” 12:22 PM
  • operaassport: One word about the protests: FIZZLE! As for the Gelb must go crowd: what an odd mix of people.... 12:17 PM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: It’s always the West that has to bend over backwards to accommodate anyone... 12:17 PM
  • Kenhere: On the contrary, the opera begins with sympathy for the hijackers, in the Chorus of Exiled... 12:15 PM
  • armerjacquino: America is making a serious mistake by putting themselves as the religious fundamentalis... 12:11 PM
  • LittleMasterMiles: The “more-like-a n-oratorio” criticism has been around forever, as though... 12:05 PM

Top hatters

When Mike Nichols was honored at the Kennedy Center, Elaine May said of his work: “Mike has chosen to do things that are really meaningful, and that have real impact, and real relevance, but he makes them so entertaining and exciting that they’re as much fun as if they were trash.” Christopher Alden has pulled the same bit of trickery at the San Francisco Opera with a production of Handel’s Partenope that is so erudite and theatrically audacious and also such a rollicking ride, it’s hard to believe it isn’t crap.   Read more »

Martinu, very dry

Gotham Chamber Opera, which began to operate twelve years ago with a double bill of Bohuslav Martinu’s quirky little pieces, opened its 2014-15 season with two more, Alexandre bis (Alexander, twice) and Comedy on the Bridge. Both were composed in the 1930s, when Martinu, like any East European with artistic aspirations, was living in Paris. There, he became acquainted with the neo-classicism of Stravinsky, the modernism of Les Six, with surrealism and le jazz hot. His music is difficult to pigeonhole: quirky, light, individual. When war broke out, he absconded to America, which he enjoyed, but he returned to Europe before his death in 1959.  Read more »

Bach to Bach

Before leaving for Paris—where I am studying for the semester—many of my friends instructed me to get lost in the City of Light and meander through the labyrinths of cafés and galleries. I have just emerged from a different sort of journey, less spontaneous but equally disorienting. Three nights, three concert halls, and three incredibly diverse programmes: from Bach (and not just the one you know) to Rameau to Mahler and Schoenberg. I had planned to go in chronological order—but I simply must tell you right away about the intimate Gurrelieder I just experienced at Opera Bastille. Read more »

Lansbury

Doyenne

On this day in 1925 English-American actress Angela Lansbury was born.

Read more »

Macbeth

Ricevete la mercè de’vostri onori

Join the party, cher public, for the free web broadcast of Macbeth tonight starting at 7:15. Of course, La Casa della Cieca will be buzzing!

Read more »

Photo: Richard Termine

Mourning in America

“Taken by itself, the St. Matthew Passion felt a little mundane. But compared to Zauberflöte, it could have been the Second Coming.”

Read more »

Alexandre

Daily double

Here’s a quick last-minute quiz for you Martinu fans out there: answer the question after the jump and win two tickets to Gotham Chamber Opera’s double bill program of Alexandre bis and Comedy on the Bridge this week.

Read more »

Marie Antoinette

I cannot wear my crown upon my heart

On this day in 1793, Queen Marie-Antoinette of France was tried and convicted in a swift, pre-determined trial in the Palais de Justice, Paris, and condemned to death the following day.

Read more »

The Letter

Day of victory

That miracle of the internet age, the slow leak, has begun.

Read more »

Gillebo

One more into the breeches

“Norwegian mezzo-soprano Ingeborg Gillebo will make her Met debut singing the role of Cherubino in this evening’s performance of Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro, replacing Isabel Leonard, who is ill.”

Read more »