Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Flora del Rio Grande: Well done, Gualtier. Thank you. I had forgot about the Goerke-Soviero tuition, and yes... 5:08 PM
  • Maury D: Death in Venice or: the only opera that has ever given me a non-metaphorical headache. 5:01 PM
  • Flora del Rio Grande: Yes, aulus, it was Agrippina! I agree with you about that season and several others... 4:48 PM
  • marshiemarkII: what’s wrong with “flattenR 21; as in lay them supine with pleasure, carisssima... 4:45 PM
  • manou: It’s the “flattenR 21; that bothers me – surely that can’t be the aim? 4:36 PM
  • marshiemarkII: “If she is wearing silk and satin she can flatten any Latin…” Now that’s definitely my... 4:17 PM
  • marshiemarkII: My beloveds all, the gurl shall be back next week, that I promise! hugs to all :-P 4:09 PM
  • Clita del Toro: Today my partner, Mike forced me to buy tickets for four operas at LOC this season: 6... 4:02 PM
  • Gualtier M: I have several times wanted to throw my panties onstage during performances of “Hansel und... 3:53 PM
  • Henry Holland: Thanks so much for posting that JML, a terrific performance. I really liked the conducing and... 3:52 PM

He is big

Falstaff, Verdi’s final opera, is exuberantly inventive, bubbling and roiling with ideas the 79-year-old composer was too impatient to develop. It’s a work bursting with miraculously youthful vigor, which the newly invigorated James Levine brought to the Metropolitan Opera on December 6. Levine rightfully reveres Falstaff, and his light, deft touch and detailed musical ear were matched in Robert Carsen’s witty, visually stunning production, where Shakespeare’s Merry Wives live in 1950’s Windsor, leaving their bright kitchens to lunch at smart restaurants.   Read more »

Teen queen

Handel’s first surviving musical composition is Almira, the opera he wrote in a hurry when shake-ups at the Hamburg opera house, where the 19-year-old had been playing in the violin section, left a planned production unfinished. Mixing German and Italian text, stuffed with French dances and pageantry, and with a comic servant character right out of Venetian opera, Almira is as up-to-date as the cosmopolitan city got in 1705.  Read more »

Desert fox

Karol Szymanowski’s 1926 King Roger was the sleeper hit of SFO’s season, not so much for its weird, mystical theme and feeble libretto but because the music is powerfully effective and Evan Rogister handled the shimmering, richly expressionistic orchestral writing with consummate skill. The choral writing is ravishing, especially the ecclesiastical Russian-sounding opening movement that emerges from the stark sounds of bells and gongs.   Read more »

pearl_fishers

The desert song

You Parterrestrials know all about Santa Fe Opera’s amazing mountain setting and open-sided theater affording breathtaking sunsets, weather-related drama and–when the back stage wall is opened–starry backdrops, but it was my first visit, so indulge me a little.

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