Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin: Another fact which I have not seen in any of the media on the Met’s production... 1:09 AM
  • Chanterelle: Adams was hustled into his seat after the house lights went down–no doubt a security... 1:03 AM
  • Dabrowski: Thanks for your review! This makes me all that much more eager to see it next month. By the time... 12:57 AM
  • Satisfied: How many articles are going to fuck up on reporting on this opera? My favorite still is the... 12:46 AM
  • Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin: Thanks so much for your pre-performance reports and your general review. I... 12:37 AM
  • Satisfied: Er….Correcti on: “Often, directors new to opera DON’T know what or how to... 12:36 AM
  • Satisfied: Yes LittleMaster, she was a few rows behind me in the orchestra, She said “Piece of... 12:22 AM
  • Satisfied: Just back from the house and settling in with a nice glass of bourbon…and yet I can’t... 12:14 AM
  • brahseph: She yelled “piece of sh*t” – couldn’t tell if she was referring to the... 12:09 AM
  • Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin: Miles, thank you so much for sharing that. You have always been an... 12:08 AM

Martinu, very dry

Gotham Chamber Opera, which began to operate twelve years ago with a double bill of Bohuslav Martinu’s quirky little pieces, opened its 2014-15 season with two more, Alexandre bis (Alexander, twice) and Comedy on the Bridge. Both were composed in the 1930s, when Martinu, like any East European with artistic aspirations, was living in Paris. There, he became acquainted with the neo-classicism of Stravinsky, the modernism of Les Six, with surrealism and le jazz hot. His music is difficult to pigeonhole: quirky, light, individual. When war broke out, he absconded to America, which he enjoyed, but he returned to Europe before his death in 1959.  Read more »

Sweet prince

The rediscovery of Franco Faccio’s Amleto, a curious score that last week, via Baltimore Concert Opera, received its first performances since 1871, reminds us just how tough an act Giuseppe Verdi was to follow.   Read more »

About last night

For those who like their Handel loud, with no forfeit of baroque finesse, one promising solution is to make the hall smaller. The WhiteboxLab>Sound Lounge, presented at a gallery on Broome Street off the Bowery (what neighborhood is that? Let’s just call it the Bowery—where they say such things and they do such things), is a fine size for baroque opera if the voices are the tiny, refined sort who used to inhabit early music venues. For R. B. Schlather’s presentation of Alcina (continuing through tonight), the voices are huge without loss of agility (or acting chops), and the entire occasion is theatrical without compromising musical standards worthy of this brilliant score.   Read more »

tote_stadt

In Bruges

They say that Boston, despite many cultural distinctions, ain’t no opera town, and for some decades—generations?—this has been true. But tides of change will break, even on the shores of the Hub.

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as_one_2

Outskirts

As One is an opera about a boy growing up to discover that he is a girl.

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falstaff

Great shakes

The little opera companies of New York are like chanterelles.

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Meade as Lucrezia

The curse of drink

Two operas both alike in dignity, set in dimly lit Renaissance towns ruled by seething, conspiratorial courts.

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dagger

Indian summer

“Who will dare dance with me the ancient Dagger-Dance of the Californians?”

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rimsky

The Night They Raided Rimsky’s

Opera-lovers who attend too much modern opera may find that it feels like duty.

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passenger

Notes on camp

Zofia Posmysz spent two years as a prisoner in Auschwitz—and she’s still alive and standing pretty tall, in New York for the Lincoln Center Festival God bless her.

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