Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • phoenix: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=8_8w AYHXJ5c httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=SKvm bfZCszU 11:23 AM
  • oedipe: But I was struck by its similarity with the photos I saw of the Bayerische Staatsoper bldg. after... 11:22 AM
  • Bill: Krunoslav – well yes, Lysiart does require a Paul Schoeffler timbre – Ryan Kuster sang it... 11:08 AM
  • DellaCasaFan: It’s interesting that both Caballe and Sutherland had made their sensational US debuts... 11:08 AM
  • Chanterelle: Here’s the thing: there’s been months of ugly posturing to the press from both... 11:06 AM
  • manou: Plus there is also this: http://www.bayeris che.staatsoper.de/ 861-ZG9tPWRvbTEmbX NnX2lkPTE3MjY1-... 11:01 AM
  • manou: God forbid. 10:48 AM
  • kashania: Mozart Freak: Fair enough, there has been plenty of invective expressed at the unions here. But... 10:46 AM
  • DeepSouthSenior: I’m encouraged reading the positive comments about William Burden. Burden is... 10:46 AM
  • La marquise de Merteuil: Aida – Sesostri re d’egitto (Terredellas) Traviata – Semele... 10:45 AM

The curse of drink

Two operas both alike in dignity, set in dimly lit Renaissance towns ruled by seething, conspiratorial courts. Parties blaze, alleyway shadows threaten, half the characters are spies or bravos for the other half, plus a few on spec. Love is in short supply, usually twisted. What these folks need is a competent social worker with a dagger-proof vest and a cast-iron stomach. What they get is melody to live upon and die upon, melody as rich and various as the forms of pasta.   Read more »

Indian summer

“Who will dare dance with me the ancient Dagger-Dance of the Californians?” cries Castro the half-breed, smashing his knife into the dirt amidst a Fiesta in old Santa Barbara, circa 1829. To everyone’s astonishment, Natoma, last princess of the island Indians, sinks her dagger in the ground beside Castro’s. After all, the pretty American naval officer has sung a love duet with Natoma’s (whiter) school chum. What has Natoma left to live for? And someone’s blood must flow. Read more »

The Night They Raided Rimsky’s

Opera-lovers who attend too much modern opera may find that it feels like duty. There are fine voices, there are good actors, there are intricate orchestrations, there are politically relevant themes—isn’t that why people go to the opera? Or isn’t it?

But where is joy in this music? Where is a score so full of magic that the heart soars on wings of melody, as archetypal figures love, hate, conspire, poison, torture, stab, warble their way into our hearts? Where is delight? Where is inspiration? Where is the audience ecstatic with adulation and astonishment at the revelation of a great unknown score? Where are the tunes so captivating that we float home on a magic carpet of melody?   Read more »

passenger

Notes on camp

Zofia Posmysz spent two years as a prisoner in Auschwitz—and she’s still alive and standing pretty tall, in New York for the Lincoln Center Festival God bless her.

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eliot

And Hanson is as Hanson did it, too!

Think of it as the anti-Puritani.

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paladin

Haydn in plain sight

The operas of Franz Josef Haydn are seldom presented in the great opera houses of the world, but then, they weren’t composed for the great opera houses of his own world.

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Gun-Brit_Barkmin

A dream deferred

Andris Nelsons led the Vienna Philharmonic in a performance of Salome that provided just the sort of thing one hopes for in a concert performance of an overflowingly rich operatic score.

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goerne

Whispers and cries

We were not at Carnegie Hall to hear superb opera singers bestow their vocalism upon Alban Berg’s Wozzeck; we are there to hear the Wiener Staatsoper’s house band work their magic upon an intricate, spooky, devastating score.

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ladro

A sense of occasion

On February 29, 1812 (thanks to Pope Gregory’s calendrical reforms), Gioachino Rossini celebrated his fourth birthday.

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Peter Gijsbertsen_Jacques Imbrailo_PC_Richard Hubert Smith

Billy’s club

When Winston Churchill was First Sea Lord, the story goes, an indignant admiral accused him of violating British naval tradition, to which Churchill replied that the only traditions of the British Navy were rum, sodomy and the lash.

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