Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • williams: But LaCieca my point was to encourage youth attendance for the future good. Not on the prices in... 2:28 AM
  • La Cieca: I realize there are several different people talking on this thread, but I have just seen comments... 2:09 AM
  • Feldmarschallin: Last night was the eagerly awaited debut of Sonya Yoncheva and she did not disappoint. The... 2:05 AM
  • Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin: Gualtier, I knew about the Parravicini designs, but wasn’t aware that... 1:30 AM
  • PokeyGascon: I am aware he has other engagements, I was curious as to how he is perceived at The Met and what... 1:29 AM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: Stai delirando! Vai a dormire! 1:11 AM
  • williams: That had escaped my notice. Unconscionable. “Oooh… let’s squeeze a couple of... 1:08 AM
  • Camille: Diavolessa, lo so bene che sei tu!!! Comunque sia, ogni fior nasce e poi muore, poi non c’è... 1:02 AM
  • Guestoria Unpopularenka: Thanks for the reply. I just saw it. Do you mean they sometimes sell tickets to the... 12:59 AM
  • bluecabochon: The Met’s “Lulu” remains visually stunning. I started going to the opera... 12:58 AM

A dream deferred

That’s more like it! On Saturday night, the day after a Wozzeck somewhat short on thrills, the “Vienna: City of Dreams” festival at Carnegie Hall continued, with Andris Nelsons leading the Vienna Philharmonic in a performance of Salome that provided just the sort of thing one hopes for in a concert performance of an overflowingly rich operatic score.   Read more »

Whispers and cries

Concert opera performances usually put the singers in front of the orchestra. The Vienna Philharmonic fills the stage with orchestra and puts the singers on raised platforms at either side. The reasoning, perhaps is: We were not at Carnegie Hall to hear superb opera singers bestow their vocalism upon Alban Berg’s Wozzeck; we are there to hear the Wiener Staatsoper’s house band work their magic upon an intricate, spooky, devastating score.   Read more »

A sense of occasion

On February 29, 1812 (thanks to Pope Gregory’s calendrical reforms), Gioachino Rossini celebrated his fourth birthday. He was twenty years old and not yet famous. It was necessary that he achieve fame, and soon.   Read more »

Peter Gijsbertsen_Jacques Imbrailo_PC_Richard Hubert Smith

Billy’s club

When Winston Churchill was First Sea Lord, the story goes, an indignant admiral accused him of violating British naval tradition, to which Churchill replied that the only traditions of the British Navy were rum, sodomy and the lash.

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orphee_thumb

Orpheus goes downtown

Marc-Antoine Charpentier came along at the wrong time for a composer of French opera.

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Play-of-Daniel

Golden oldie

Eight hundred years ago, the “youth of Beauvais” in the north of France created a sacred festival “play,” Ludus Danieli (ludus—meaning a sacred event? a performance? a game? a joke?) for the annual Fool’s Night on January 1 at the cathedral.

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bonfire

Light my foyer

Each year, Leon Botstein leads the American Symphony Orchestra in a concert opera or two.

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Anthony Dean Griffey as Peter Grimes

Britten on the wind

Ambiguity. That’s the theme of the operas of Benjamin Britten (ennobled as Baron Britten of Aldeburgh).

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sakuntala

Disoriented

What we go to Grattacielo for is fresh young voices singing their guts out.

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frau

Two ladies in the shade…

The simple fable at the heart of Die Frau ohne Schatten shouldn’t be difficult to parse, but Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s libretto juggles its vaguely Jungian, vaguely Arabian Nights symbolitry as if with intent to mystify and bewilder.

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