Cher Public

  • gerbear: Thank you PCally: Ms. Pieczonka was the first person I thought of as well. 10:38 PM
  • Krunoslav: “what to make of Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II? ” That’s a Poker Scene to rival the one in FANCIULLA. 9:10 PM
  • m. croche: The lyrical, expressive score by Paula M. Kimper is the opera’s central attraction, and the closest comparison I can make to... 4:38 PM
  • La Cieca: Check back tomorrow at noon for a link to the video and a discussion page for La Juive. 4:23 PM
  • NPW-Paris: Another senior moment. I read “porker̶ 1;. 1:25 PM
  • Jungfer Marianne Leitmetzerin: Anna Netrebko’s “Vier letzte Lieder” (“Four Last Songs”) of Richard Strauss are now on Mixcloud. Christian... 1:04 PM
  • laddie: Whoops, WRONG day, dearie. 11:52 AM
  • laddie: No thread for La Juive? 11:51 AM

Jersey shore

GrimesYou don’t often hear the grand operas of Benjamin Britten on smaller stages. They re such subtle interactions of precise, detailed orchestral and choral effects with so many demanding (and highly rewarding) vocal parts, besides calling for a naturalistic acting style of a sort seldom called for by the grand operas of a previous era that only a company of tremendous resource, musical and otherwise, can give them without risking serious humiliation.  Read more »

Ezio said than done

EzioGluck composed Ezio for the Carnival in Prague in 1750, a dozen years before he entered his so-called “reform” era. The piece was a hit for a year or two, then (as was usual) forgotten, its music available for judicious recycling. But its success was no freak: This is an exciting score, waiting for the properly schooled forces to restore it to the stage. There have been several happy European revivals lately but none in America.  Read more »

“This is the very ecstasy of love”

Amleto 1The grand illusion is that we know it all. From four hundred years of opera, we’ve distilled the worthy survivors. There are opera lovers who believe that—there are certainly impresarios who believe it—in the teeth of all the evidence: the forgotten rep that is revived with astonishing success (baroque, bel canto, verismo). And then there are operas that were never part of the repertory, stuffed in a drawer and forgotten, today recovered and necessary: Les Troyens, Gezeichneten, Mitridate, Ermione, Maria Stuarda. Will Franco Faccio’s Amleto join them?  Read more »

Malvina

Live and empoisoned

In how many operas does the heroine drink poison and then go lengthily mad?

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Yale

Another man’s Persian

The seventeenth-century works of Francisco Cavalli may be easier for modern audiences to accept.

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Gioconda

Il giocondo

With six leads in Gioconda, you can reliably hope that three or four will be worth listening to, or why would they have revived the opera?

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Dünya

In harem’s way

Othello in the Seraglio is the rather unfortunate title bestowed by the ensemble Dünya on its “coffeehouse opera,” ossia The Tragedy of Sümbül the Black Eunuch.

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Poliuto

Donizetti, lionized

Just when you thought it was safe to return to Rossini and Verdi—blam!

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Education

French tickler

The concert presented by Opera Lafayette at the Alliance Française last Friday and Saturday was devoted to music of witty, short-lived Emmanuel Chabrier, notably Une Éducation Manquée.

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Sonnambula Juilliard

I don’t sleep, I dream

Bellini blossomed over us like a love fest.

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