Cher Public

  • swordsnsolvers: I stand corrected! I should have been more precise: bad American yokel tour guide accent. 10:31 PM
  • phoenix: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=Cts- 6SxZJmk 9:58 PM
  • mjmacmtenor: Works well for period costumes. https://s-media-ca che-ak0.pinimg.com /236x/9e/81/e7/9e8 1e76990f2f950c1526 2e2f99debdd.jpg 9:51 PM
  • gustave of montreal: I’m sorry to read that you have a different opinion about «musicals». It is a sin here to disagree. Now you are... 9:32 PM
  • danpatter: If memory serves, her mother insisted she was born one day previous to that listed on her birth certificate. So not a huge... 6:02 PM
  • armerjacquino: And Alex Kelly, who doesn’t have the technique of an opera singer but is the only Cunegonde I’ve ever heard... 5:58 PM
  • armerjacquino: It doesn’t bother me in the slightest what you think, you’re a stranger. That’s quite a solipsistic... 4:53 PM
  • aulus agerius: Today I’m watching the YT of Perfect American and my response is similar – just a lot of talking over subdued... 4:51 PM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »