Cher Public

  • jackoh: What makes Hoffmann worthwhile to me is that it is a meditation on an artist and his life. It is one thing to produce art, it is... 6:12 PM
  • Dolciamente Pipo: A little late to the game, but I have to say I agree with you. This sounds labored and unmusical to my ears. Like heavy... 6:12 PM
  • la vociaccia: è possibile che il ‘inneggiamo& #8217; sarà bella. Niente altro… 5:51 PM
  • kashania: That’s a lot of fun. 4:16 PM
  • La Cieca: 4:01 PM
  • redbear: An Austrian newspaper has her and Roberto in Lohengrin at Bayreuth in 2018. 3:53 PM
  • La Cieca: Divas, They’re Just Like Us: Anna loses (and retrieves) an earring whilst singing Kálmán. httpv://www.you... 3:24 PM
  • armerjacquino: de los Angeles was a soprano! As far as Garanca is concerned, I can certainly see her as Eboli- the Veil Song is surely a... 3:22 PM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »