Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Camille: Thanks so much, Feldmarschallin!! My prayers have been answered for my wish to hear this work and... 9:48 PM
  • Lindoro Almaviva: Wouldn’t it? i am in Chicago often enough, i am but less than  miles away from Chicago 9:01 PM
  • Clita del Toro: Lindoro, that would be fun! 8:42 PM
  • Grane: Can’t get this in the right place, but thanks, Cicciabella, for the review of Anna’s Four... 8:10 PM
  • phoenix: dan, I can’t find the exact casts for the last 2 operas, but today I found a site that claims... 8:04 PM
  • manou: Yes marshie – but before the supine bit there should be a more vertical phase. 7:18 PM
  • Cicciabella: Any singer who appears “freshly engaged”, “majestic 221;, “unsuppor... 7:04 PM
  • Gualtier M: I also heard several performances by Goerke that were disappointing. The Mme. Lidoine at the Met... 6:43 PM
  • DonCarloFanatic: The garbled Google Translate was a poem of sheer beauty. They liked her, they really liked... 6:25 PM
  • danpatter: I’m glad to know about this. Thanks, Phoenix. 6:22 PM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »