Cher Public

  • danpatter: I guess I’m a hopeless romantic/sentiment alist. The ARABELLA finale never fails to get to me. I like this opera even... 11:22 AM
  • redbear: It was absolutely clear to me that Castorf was deliberately making fun of and emphasizing the banality of the story and I cannot... 10:09 AM
  • Camille: PCally–I have no time to chat this morning but I must tell you– Just go to that link which sogalitno has provided... 9:32 AM
  • WindyCityOperaman: More Romberg: httpvh://www.youtu be.com/watch?v=70D H050eqUQ httpvh://www.youtu be.com/watch?v=J2T alBHXaig... 8:44 AM
  • PCally: Camille that’s the most I’ve heard you rave in a while. She really must be something and I’m very sorry that I... 8:14 AM
  • Cocky Kurwenal: Afternoon Milady, think I’m inclined to agree with you on Barton. I heard her live for the first time recently and... 8:02 AM
  • Cicciabella: Nie wieder Castorf! http://www.welt.de /kultur/buehne-kon zert/article157339 652/Nie-wieder-Cas torf.html 4:08 AM
  • Camille: No, you are NOT making it up, just like Anna Russell! 11:24 PM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »