Cher Public

  • marshiemarkII: Ciao manoucee, mille grazie, unfortunately they did not include the divine Sei tu che piangi, I am obsessed, I must have... 8:55 PM
  • marshiemarkII: Nice to hear from you chikita querida! Oh you must see it in the house, forget about HD, she must be heard live!, one of... 8:43 PM
  • manou: The ML videos work fine on the Met website: http://www.metoper a.org/Season/2015- 16-Season/manon-le scaut-puccini-tick ets/ 8:41 PM
  • LT: A new Handel’s Messiah from the Mormon Tabernacle Choir is to be released in a couple of weeks with Yoncheva, Mumford, Villazon... 8:31 PM
  • antikitschychick: oh wow congrats to Alagna on becoming a granddaddy! And good for him that he still has “la fiamma” that... 8:27 PM
  • Lohenfal: I figured that the disappearing link was the result of Met censorship. That wouldn’t have bothered me if their own website... 8:25 PM
  • antikitschychick: thank you for your enthusiastic review Marshie and nice to hear from you! After reading what you have to say I’m... 8:18 PM
  • marshiemarkII: I hope you saw this: http://www.nytimes .com/2016/02/11/ar ts/music/better-ca ll-roberto-alagna- steps-in-to-man... 7:40 PM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »