Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Feldmarschallin: Guten Morgen Camille and Marianne, no flowers yet but I do have a camille about to bloom... 1:44 AM
  • Operngasse: There is a very nice birthday entry for Samuel Ramey on barihunks.com: http://www.bari... 12:29 AM
  • DeepSouthSenior: . . . Greatest DISadvantage . . . 12:02 AM
  • DeepSouthSenior: Ah, La Rondine. Some lovely music, but more dramatically inert than Act I of Parsifal, and... 11:59 PM
  • Camille: haha, I would have been surprised if that Requiem would have worked for anyone, Feldmarschie! How... 11:23 PM
  • Camille: Glyndebourne is one thing, singing it in a big house is another. Didn’t Nina Stemme sing... 11:20 PM
  • Camille: München 2010? It seems like it was so much later than that, that not so much time has elapsed. So... 11:18 PM
  • Camille: o danke wohl!! That explains it. I have that play and started to read it years ago but never did.... 11:16 PM
  • Lohenfal: In the Victor Hugo play, the King is referred to consistently as Don Carlos, even after he becomes... 11:11 PM
  • Lohengrin: That was in München 2010. Scala: JK was Einspringer in the second performance. 10:12 PM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »