Cher Public

  • Camille: Make sure to visit les roses d’Ispahan!!! I have friends from that city who now have long dwelled in the trenches of... 4:48 PM
  • Camille: O lorenzino bello! — perdona! I have been busy with Venerdì Nero and now I am shipwrecked in the middle of the Indian Ocean... 4:39 PM
  • manou: Pas beaucoup d’écrevisses en Iran. 4:35 PM
  • NPW-Paris: The caviar was local. And there might have been saffron in the Sauce nantua. 4:20 PM
  • manou: Certainly great strides in rhinoplasty – very popular with Iranian beauties. 4:14 PM
  • NPW-Paris: To save you the trouble of looking… httpv://www.youtub j7yop-4 4:12 PM
  • NPW-Paris: Danpatter, I think you really should find Bank Ban on Youtube. 4:10 PM
  • Krunoslav: I fond of SIEGFRIED, but find the Erda/Wanderer scene to be lesser music, even when enacted by performers of immense skill (... 4:09 PM

The end of glasnost?

When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »