Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • Feldmarschallin: Anti I am not sure about Yoncheva and those roles. Every soprano is different and some who... 5:44 AM
  • RobNYNY: Joan Ingpen has ruined more evenings at the Met than any cougher in the Tubercular Circle. John... 5:02 AM
  • mia apulia: will someone please explain how this happened? it is so awful it is almost wonderful 12:37 AM
  • operadunce: Actually, I find parterre.com to be informative and entertaining most of the time. I certainly... 12:07 AM
  • antikitschychick: Very well put EarlyRomantic. I wholeheartedly agree with you, except I don’t think... 11:54 PM
  • stevey: Manou, Kashie…. I am due to leave Toronto tomorrow, bound for Providence, then Miami, and... 11:43 PM
  • EarlyRomantic: On this Thanksgiving Day, I am grateful for the myriad operatic artists past and present who... 10:51 PM
  • La Cieca: The way you sought out parterre.com, you mean? 10:30 PM
  • operadunce: Sorry, but I’m not in your kitchen. I don’t need to trash someone else to feel better... 9:40 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Well she is used to upstate NY wet winters. She does not look happy in the phot with... 9:16 PM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »