Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • WindyCityOperaman: Appropos, also the day of Stamford’s birthday anniversary. httpvh://www.yo... 6:59 AM
  • CwbyLA: I am happy to hear ladies of certain age, Jessye Norman and Kiri Te Kanawa, speak their minds. They... 6:03 AM
  • CwbyLA: Perhaps you should have said “for those who live elsewhere other than New York” since... 4:54 AM
  • Dabrowski: “The demonstration at the opera’s Lincoln Center home that greeted those attending the Met’s... 4:54 AM
  • eric: “For those who live elsewhere than the US where this opera has been performed without uproar and... 4:34 AM
  • redbear: And there is “A Blight at the Opera” in the New York Daily News, http://www.nyda... 3:47 AM
  • MontyNostry: Love the Jaho comment. 3:19 AM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=IERL MXtMZag 3:19 AM
  • Buster: Prokofiev, The Gambler. Scotto as Babulenka, Fabiano as Alexei. Babulenka is a great role for a... 2:55 AM
  • Anna Tema: I’m having a little bit too much fun imagining a Rake’s Progress with Scotto as Baba... 2:40 AM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »