Cher Public

  • Camille: www.themorgan.org Look for Alice underground. 8:40 PM
  • Camille: Speaking of Alice: at The Morgan Library www,themorgan.org there currently an exhibition devoted to the 150th year commemoration... 8:39 PM
  • Orlando Furioso: Thanks so much, Henry Holland! I do love Alice, and her treatment in music fascinates me. Richard Addinsell (of... 7:30 PM
  • kashania: I’m glad Bayreuth considers Wilson worthy of covering. Maybe they’ll cast her in something in a few years! WTF?... 7:23 PM
  • vilbastarda: Perfect! 7:22 PM
  • laddie: Review for Santa Fe’s La Fille du Regiment. Pretty much sums up how I felt about it. I found myself wishing it were... 6:54 PM
  • manou: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=g8hu XkSaL7o 6:50 PM
  • manou: Covering her tracks. 6:48 PM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »