Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • MontyNostry: Talking of Cotrubas, whom I saw on stage as Violetta, Elisabetta and Tatyana, and in... 10:33 PM
  • NPW-Paris: (Just to be clear: the opening night reviews had thus not prepared me for what I heard when I was... 10:33 PM
  • NPW-Paris: I heard her only once, in Boccanegra: “Ana Maria Martinez was, it seems, petrified on the... 10:31 PM
  • Operngasse: Jungfer – Thank you so much for mentioning Martine van Hamel. One of the great American... 10:31 PM
  • MontyNostry: Camille, dear, I find that very reassuring! Thank you. 10:30 PM
  • Camille: Thanks, armerjay, for I had this home from the library but hadn’t the time to listen. I got... 10:21 PM
  • Camille: MontyN. You have volleyed on back my exact sentiments re all three sopranos spoken of above, not... 10:18 PM
  • Camille: How is that ending different, please? Is that in the UE score? Have only heard the the usually done... 10:10 PM
  • Camille: It’s very interesting to hear what you have to say about the Cotrubas Traviata. She was so... 10:02 PM
  • NPW-Paris: Damn. “… from natural causes”. Sorry. 9:56 PM

The end of glasnost?


When Mikhail Gorbachev assumed the mantle of the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1985, a palpable change was felt in the air, from Novosibirsk to East Berlin. Words like glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) began to replace the gradually outmoded Leninist philosophies that had become warped under Stalin and Andropov. The possibilities were palpable, and soon manifested into thousands of Muscovites calling for Gorbachev to resign in 1990, following the latter half of the decade teeming with what David Remnick aptly described for the New Yorker as “argument, truth-telling, irony, hysteria, and scandal” on state television.   Read more »