Cher Public

Nunzio di gioia è il bel sorriso

Happy 57th birthday soprano Cecilia Gasdia

Born on this day in 1892 soprano Emma Luart.

Born on this day in 1901 conductor Franz Konwitschny.

Born on this day in 1904 baritone and teacher Martial Singher.

Born on this day in 1913 tenor Ferruccio Tagliavini.

Born on this day in 1921 stage director Giorgio Strehler.

Born on this day in 1923 composer William Flanagan.
(none of his vocal music or operas yet posted)

Born on this day in 1924 conductor Georges Prêtre.

Happy 83rd birthday tenor Horst Hiestermann.

Also Happy 57th to singer and actress Sarah Brightman.

  • CwbyLA

    Interesting archival document of Leyla Gencer’s recital in Istanbul
    http://www.trtarsiv.com/izle/104658/10-istanbul-festivali-leyla-gencer-konseri

    • Dan Patterson

      Thanks for this, I quite enjoyed it. She ends with a lovely “Vivi ingrato.”

  • Elza Von Barabant

    A Very Happy Birthday to Madame Gasdia and a wonderful blast from the past!!!!

    Act 1 Duet and ensemble from Beatrice di Tenda from 1986

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2I9AMxQIWY&app=desktop

    AND

    The Act 1 Finale

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZrC-BKNSN0k&app=desktop

    Concerto Finale Corso di Direzione della Lirica 1986
    Michael Recchiuti, conductor
    Cecilia Gasdia, Renata Daltin, Vincenzo Bello, Bruno DeSimone, Giovanni Palmieri
    Orchestra Fiharmonica di Russe
    Coro del Teatro Comunale di Firenze

  • Damianjb1

    The first time I heard Cecilia Gasdia was in a VHS recording of Turandot from Verona with Ghena Dimitrova. Her singing was extremely beautiful.

    • I first saw her in Moïse at the Palais Garnier with Samuel Ramey, where she caused quite a media buzz.

  • Armerjacquino

    My late father wrote a play about Vivaldi and the girls of the Ospedale della Pieta in Venice. The story centred on one particular girl who wanted to carry on making music rather than be married off, who eventually persuades Vivaldi to let her audition as a singer. We hear her first performance offstage at the climax of the play. Dad asked me (as a 17 year old opera nerd) to suggest something suitably virtuosic which would also make an exciting piece of music to close the play. I chose Gasdia singing In Furore and if I say so myself, it was a damn good choice. The same recording was used when the play was broadcast on BBC radio.

  • aulus agerius

    The reedy-voiced Eric Cutler singing Enee and Bacchus next season in Dresden and Festival d’Aix respectively surprises me! Unimaginable! I first saw him as the Steuerman in ~2004 and a little later he ruined the Netrebko Puritani for me.

    • CarlottaBorromeo

      If you’d heard his exceptional Don José in London two years ago you might not be surprised at all. Speculating on long-term futures is a tricky business not only in the Square Mile…

  • Cicciabella

    Have any parterrians seen the Currentzis/Sellars Clemenza di Tito in Salzburg live (webcast now available on medici.tv)? The LA Times loved it (https://www.google.co.uk/amp/www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-cm-sellars-clemenza-salzburg-review-20170815-story,amp.html). Maybe live makes all the difference. Onscreen I found Currentzis capricious and irritating. Among others, he inserted long rests in Parto, parto (clarinettist and Sesto both prostrate themselves to sing/play it). I didn’t think Tito was Mandela-like at all, but a terrifying despot, despite his clemency. Clemenza is long enough without the chorus miming Sellarsian “choreography” to long excerpts from Mozart’s religious music. Soloists get to sing “Laudamus te” and other liturgical settings. Beautiful to listen too, but adding what exactly to the opera? Sesto and Annio wonderful, Vitellia and Servilia very good. I was expecting much from Russell Thomas, but Mozart doesn’t seem to fully show off his talents. We’re getting this production on Amsterdam next season, although the Sesto will be TBA instead of Crebassa. I’m already regretting having bought a ticket. Does anyone else agree with the LA Times? (I’m willing to be converted.)

    • fletcher

      I wouldn’t put much stock in the LA Times -- I find Mark Swed’s reviews useless most of the time. I’d wish for his departure if I weren’t worried the Times would simply use the opportunity to do away with classical reviews altogether.

      • Cicciabella

        In any case, not a boring production/performance. Currentzis is controversial, and he loves being that way.