Cher Public

Alla pompadour che s’appresta, meco, o schiava, assisterai!

Appearances to the contrary, La Cieca is not teasing when she invites the cher public (pictured) to enjoy discussion of off-topic and general interest subjects.

Also, a reminder that the “Brass Menagerie” competition is drawing to its close. Hurry and get your guesses in before tomorrow’s deadline!

  • zinka

    Jan.9, 1921..LOVED this guy..(in)famous for his Carmen walkout,causing Gloria Lane to commit SUICIDIO….Really a gorgeous voice..I think he died in a plane crash????? I saw Poleri in Traviata and Butterfly..Rich voice.
    Listen to his Pique Dame (in Italian)…end of barracks scene he goes BALLISTIC!!!!!!

  • Don_Dano

    It is just one person’s opinion, but I think Patricia Racette acquitted herself well as Salome in San Antonio last night. I believe there is another performance on Sunday afternoon which I hope goes equally as well.

    In a bit of unusual staging, the soldiers shoot Herodias before shooting Salome. Otherwise, it was a pretty traditional staging but in nonbiblical dress and nonbiblical weapons.

    So Good Luck to the NEW Opera San Antonio!

  • zinka

    The guy who posted this is named BAUM. Compared to Bonisolli, Baum was GEDDA… What a jerk!!!!!

    • Bill

      Zinka -- when I saw his Trovatore in Vienna, Bonisolli
      was indeed a serious artist and his high notes
      brought the house down. He was a bit hammy
      during curtain calls. One of the most exciting
      renditions of this aria I can recall was that of
      James McCracken circa 1965-6 (with Stella, Herlea and Sandra Warfield) -- McCracken’s high C’s lasted
      forever and he had 4 vociferous curtain calls
      thereafter -- no repeats of course

  • zinka

    Most of us know pretty much the names of so many singers….however, sometimes we “miss” some of the greats,and someone luckily introduces them to us. I recall way back that someone brought me a 78 (remember them??)of Eva Turner doing “In questa reggia” and I went ballistic…
    A lady on an internet mentioned Meta Seinemeyer, who sadly died at 33. Gorgeous voice….Have there been some artists you got to know by someone else telling you of them??

  • Bill

    Zinka -- Meta Seinemeyer was one of the sopranos that
    Walter Legge had Schwarzkopf study (Seinemeyer’s
    recordings). Most of Seinemeyer’s career was in
    Dresden which followed
    Berlin. She made some guest appearances in Covent
    Garden and in Vienna and she sang in the USA with a touring German Opera company. Mainly she seems to
    be remembered for her Verdi roles -- Quite a bit of
    middle Verdi was being revived in Vienna, Dresden,
    Berlin in the late 1920s and 1930s (Don Carlo, Forza
    etc.) Had Seinemeier lived longer she would have
    probably had a wider International career though there were plenty of rivals around at the time, Rethberg,
    Ursuleac, Reining, oth Konetznis coming on, Lemnitz, Teschemacher and still even Jeritza and Lehmann and also Maria Nemeth with Cebotari coming to Dresden in
    1931 a couple of years before Seinemeyer’s death. Hildegar Ranczak was also active in Munich where she sang alot of Verdi, Forza, Ballo, Trovatore etc -- hence quite a bevy of spinto talent from the German
    speaking world at the time and I probably forgot a few ledgendary German (or Central European) sopranos of the era.

    • Camille

      Bill,
      Then, was it Dresden and Berlin, specifically, where all that mid or late Verdi re-examination began? I became very interested in that movement after having checked a recording from the library @ NYPAL, long ago; featuring a revival of “Die Sizilianer Vespers” or whatever it was called auf Deutsch. Curiousity was my main motivation, and thought it would be all a joke as it was sung in German, but it actually worked rather surprisingly well, strange to say! All I remember of the cast was that Maud.Cunitz sang the Helena and cannot recall the city and theatre.

      Anyway, it was a very interesting, mportant movement of its day and did a lot to first make people start to re-consider Verdi. i have always meant to read up some more about it —-that’s why I am mentioning it.

      Thank you und zuviel Liebe!

  • Bill

    Camille -- I think the mid-later Verdi revival in the
    late 1920s and 1930s in Mittel Europa was not
    simply the action of one opera house for certainly
    it appeared more or less simultaneously in Dresden, Berlin, certainly Vienna with Reining and others,
    Munich and I would surmise also Hamburg and elsewhere
    for the leading singers of these opera houses made
    appearances (when allowed) in the others “als Gast”.
    Rudolf Bing was in Vienna and knew these works from the
    Staatsoper and that is why he began to revive some of
    them very early in his Management at the Met -- Don Carlo, Forza, Ballo -- but then he had the singers
    available, Milanov to be sure, Tucker, Bjoerling, Warren, Merrill, Siepi etc.
    Of course in the later 1920s and 1930s in Germany and
    Austria all operas were sung in German -- but each
    opera house had a plethora of singers bound to them
    who could do justice to these operas at the time
    and many of the great conductors in the German opera
    houses liked to conduct them. I do not know what
    was happening in Italy then, but probably more late
    Verismo was all the mode, not middle Verdi. I wonder why Milanov never sang in Don Carlo -- Delia Rigal was
    hardly spitzenklasse -- don’t know where Bing found her.

    • Camille

      Oh many thanks! It was more of a generalised look back at, and examination of Verdi, in light of all the harmonic and chromatic chaos that ensued post-Wagner and yes, I do think at that time in Italy the verismo composers were still more or less at it, of course sans Puccini after mid-20’s, but Mascagni was still grinding it out, and rather importantly, there was, of course, Respighi, whose works have never been represented enough or repeated frequently to make a dent in the oublic consciensce here in the States.

      For me, I would rather hear an opera translated into the native speech of the singer so as to aid his comfort zone, and adjust my ear to the eccentricity of the strange language. For instance, I saw The Merry Widow sung in Hungarian, not knowing a single word of which, and jnderstood from the beautiful expression and by play of the singers, their facial interaction, demonstrated just about everything I needed to know about the storyline at least for that one time performance. It was a very interesting experience for me, for that reason. Because the singers were comfortable and at ease, they put the audience (English speaking) at their ease, similarly.

      Danke, Lieber Bill!!!

    • Camille

      Oh about Delia Rigal—-there is a story behind that which I’ve either read here on parterre or somewhere else. It was part of a deal of some sort, I seem to recall, and yes, I understand better why Intendant Bing made the rather radical choice of opening his tenure, or should I say ‘autocratic reign’, with Don Carlo. Makes better sense now to me.

      Thank you. You are the Stanley Sadie of parterre box.

  • zinka

    Galvany always said that if Callas was around..she might be more appreciated…she let it all hang out…50 years of friendship…GREAT singing…but Veltri wanted to kill her after the E flat…

  • Camille

    This is far too little and too late but I would like to extend my sympathy to all of our correspondants in France, particularly to Parisians. There is nothing to say that will help but I am so deeply sorry for all this horrible event, and pray you are safe and that Monsieur oedipe will check in with us. My condolences.

  • zinka

    Comments to follow..Born Jan.11, 1894….

  • zinka

    Whether or not Bindernagel was separated from her husband the banker who faced economic and financial uncertainty in the economically and financially uncertain 1930’s as reported by the not always reliable Time magazine is unclear, but what is clear is that Wilhelm Hintze was one paranoically jealous husband. It is tragic that he could not have waited somewhat longer to shoot his supposedly unfaithful spouse at least until some time after the economic miracle that occured in Germany between ’33 and ’39 when his wife would have been well able to bequeath to Wagnerians and opera lovers more recordings and perhaps even a visit or two to Bayreuth.
    Sad…La gelosia…

  • zinka

    The night after we saw Warren die, Mar.5,1960,we were somewhat uplifted….and thrilled..at the Chenier with Zinka and Bergonzi (last duet in the high key)..Note especially Zinka’s “Abbracciami, AMAAAAANTE”which is one of her greatest moments. This is from Atlanta.but you get the idea. Compare this anything in the last years..That is like comparing me to Siepi….well,sort of…

  • zinka

    See how honest I can be!!! Marcello has a wide vibrato so far….in the house it may not be so noticeable …but I am not happy…. You see, sometimes I agree with you…