Cher Public

  • grimoaldo: The review actually explains why, the “upper part of her voice was often so edgy that the aria became truly... 3:44 PM
  • armerjacquino: Polenzani has done more than ‘offer an intriguing preview’ of his Idomeneo- he’s sung the whole part. 3:35 PM
  • Daniel: Thanks for the condescension, but I happen to believe that one never outgrows Mozart. There’s always something in his output... 3:32 PM
  • la vociaccia: When they can no longer sing it well anymore? Not a very difficult concept to grasp. Singers leave repertoire behind. 3:18 PM
  • Greg.Freed: Sierra was actually a lot more interesting out west as Lucia than the Countess. If I were playing mind-reader I’d guess... 2:58 PM
  • la vociaccia: I think PCally mentioned Schwanewilms in reference to Wilson’s Kaiserin recording (Anne being a recent notable... 2:49 PM
  • Daniel: How, exactly, is Mozart “just no longer for” any singer? 2:46 PM
  • Cocky Kurwenal: I don’t mean to take you to task, but I’d say she is more accomplished than promising. I agree that she... 2:14 PM

Pan labyrinth

Welcome to Parterre Puzzle Corner #2. But first, the solution to last week’s challenge.

If you remember, the puzzle was: what one, very unusual thing do Chausson’s Le Roi Arthus, Mozart’s Così fan tutte, and Krenek’s Jonny Spielt Auf have in common? A number of clever Parterrians solved the riddle by suggesting further additions to the list: Blow’s Venus & Adonis, Birtwistle’s The Minotaur, William Grant Still’s Troubled Island, and Shin-ichiro’s Mishima opera Rokumeikan. They also nominated conductor Julia Jones and tenor Jay Hunter Morris as performers.

What all those names have in common is that they are species of panvowel – titles or names using each English vowel exactly once (with optional “y”). There are many more singer names to be found under this category, Parterrians might have fun finding more. I myself will pose a few bonus follow-up questions:

1(a): Which composer has written two operas whose titles, when taken together, form a single panvowel?
1(b): Which composer’s last name, paired with one of his operas together make a panvowel?
1(c): For fans of Chinese opera: are there any famous dramas that, transliterated into standard pinyin, have titles that are panvowels?

Speaking of dual operas, here is this week’s puzzler:

2. Fans of this composer’s works want erudite films of two of his opera stories.

If you think you know the answer, post a video of this composer’s music.

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