Cher Public

  • gustave of montreal: Aha! a compatriot from Vancouver. 10:08 PM
  • amoebaguy: I have no problem with avant-garde productions provided they are well thought out. Christoph Marthaler’s “Hoffmann... 10:07 PM
  • vilbastarda: Hey Blanche, seems that nobody answered you. So, let’s try: he’s generally telling them how to be authentic. The... 9:16 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: He led some of the rehearsal, but became ill. He’s doing well now. It’s definitely wash you hands often... 8:05 PM
  • Salome Where She Danced: Met site announces conductor of last 3 Lulus: Derrick Inouye. Getting his Peggy Sawyer Moment at age 59. 7:52 PM
  • armerjacquino: I’ve been waiting all day to elucidate on my idiocy! I must have been unthinkingly parroting that ‘trivial... 7:47 PM
  • La Cieca: The livestream of Anna Bolena at http://www.metoper /Free-Live-Audio-S treams/ is the subject of... 7:41 PM
  • rapt: Thank God commenting has been re-enabled, so that I can introduce this highly relevant tidbit: “[Nancy] Mitford was famous for... 7:35 PM

Slow but steady

With almost three weeks to go, New York City Opera’s Kickstarter campaign is only $956,985 short of its goal. [@coopnytimes]


  • Avantialouie says:

    NYCO’s financial mismanagement goes back at least as far as the Rudel directorship. Sills stated publicly, when she took over from Rudel, that she was shocked at the company’s true financial state. It had been totally masked even from her by deceptive accounting. Ever since that time, through Kellogg, Keene, and after, NYCO has operated on the principle that an opera company’s reach should exceed it’s financial grasp, or what’s a rich donor for. Those opera houses that have been historically charged with “lack of vision” because they have forever settled for the “vision that’s affordable” are now the houses on solid economic footing. Look at the trouble that Domingo is now in in two different cities, precisely because he has spent money he did not have. NYCO is simply reaping what it has sown for 50 years. No opera house has “an” audience: they all have many small audiences. Some people go to bel canto, some to modern atonal or expressionistic works, some love the baroque, some prefer the French repertory, and some are poor opera lovers looking for inexpensive seats to respectable performances of works by composers with names ending in “i.” A house must interest and nurture each one of these groups independently, and this NYCO failed to do. Eventually, each of these audiences at NYCO become so small that the house cannot now afford to support a small-to-average-length run of an expensive new production in any one of these genre. That’s a hard fact for us to realize, those of us who read parterre, because we are members of all these audiences. But the average opera-goer isn’t. NYCO is now forced to do small, off-beat productions in small, off-beat venues with hopes of breaking even once rich donors have come to the rescue (a need pre-planned by the management as a necessity that “had” to happen.) One could not make a success of even a lemonade stand using these business practices and these marketing strategies, let alone an opera house. By NOT sending money to NYCO now, I hope I am contributing to putting the company out of its misery. That’s sad, but there’s blame enough for that to go around a truly maddening crowd.

  • Quanto Painy Fakor says:

    “Opera is a really good fit for me” I don’t get that feeling. By the time one is the music director of an opera company one should know the entire standard repertoire by heart. That includes the words, not just the beats.

  • Quanto Painy Fakor says:

    NYCO Opera now rumored to be in hospice.