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Statue of limitations

Our weekly canard concerns that greatest of all operas, Don Giovanni—or is it? The question is, if the action of the dramma giocoso transpires in the course of 24 hours, what is one to make of the detail that, less than a day after the Commentatore’s unexpected death, his monument is already in place, and with so specific an inscription to boot?

89 comments

  • grimoaldo says:

    Also philosopher Søren Kierkegaard’s essays about the theological implications of Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” have helped to elevate the opera to status of “greatest ever”.

    http://www.sorenkierkegaard.nl/artikelen/Engels/067.%20Kierkegaard_dongiovanni.pdf

    Kierkegaard thought “Don Giovanni” was not only the greatest opera, but “ranks highest among all the
    classical works” not just of music, but anything, ever.

    • antikitschychick says:

      OMG I totally have to read this…grim I am now indebted to you (for life) for posting this. I luvs Søren Kierkegaard like there’s no tomorrow…will read this in a few hours and post ma thoughts on it.

      • manou says:

        “I luvs Søren Kierkegaard like there’s no tomorrow”

        Mot Du Jour

        • laddie says:

          and apropos to earlier discussions as well:

          There are, as is known, insects that die in the moment of fertilization. So it is with all joy: life’s highest, most splendid moment of enjoyment is accompanied by death. -Søren Kierkegaard

        • Krunoslav says:

          “I luvs Søren Kierkegaard like there’s no tomorrow”

          But he had no trill.

      • havfruen says:

        Not sure you would love him if you were related to him,as I am, alas.

  • benrenki says:

    There’s a novel called Der Ruinenbaumeister, by the recently late German novelist and judge Herbert Rosendorfer, which outdoes Inception or various Renaissance novels in its layering of stories within stories. One of the stories involves a sculptor trying to get rid of a set of statues of the twelve apostles. As I recall, Don Giovanni buys one of them as a kind of act of penance to set on the grave of the Commendatore, and the narrator of that particular story points out that the convenient appearance of the sculptor explains why the statue is there so soon after his death.

    It’s a witty novel, and I think it’s been translated into English.

    Early in his career Rosendorfer served as a judge in the district that includes Bayreuth, and wrote about living there and all that it entailed.