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E il sol dell’animator

Something contemporary for the cher public: starting at 2:00 PM on Wednesday, the new Philip Glass opera The Perfect American, webcast from the Teatro Real, Madrid.  

The Perfect American is a fictionalized biography of Walt Disney‘s final months. We discover Walt’s delusions of immortality via cryogenic preservation, his tirades alongside his Abraham Lincoln talking robot, his utopian visions and his backyard labyrinth of toy trains. . . .  Walt’s wife Lillian, his confidante and perhaps his mistress Hazel, his brother Roy, his children Diane and Sharon, his close and ill-treated collaborators, and famous figures such as Andy Warhol, all contribute to the opera’s animation, its feel for the life of the Disney world.”

27 comments

  • toitoitoi says:

    Animators just dressed like regular guys; like college teachers. Short-sleeve shirts, slacks, maybe a tie. No uniforms, no lab coats. Very, very few women.

    • DonCarloFanatic says:

      Disney’s animators dressed in the standard attire of the office worker of the day. But since Glass et al. have put the animators in uniforms, it’s worthwhile to mention that they’ve done it backwards and in a slighting manner. The attempt to unionize was not a revolt of talentless clerks, but of superbly talented individuals who wanted their work toward a common creative goal to be recognized with more than a salary or piecework pay. It didn’t happen.

      • Batty Masetto says:

        What I got from my half of the production was that the animators were rendered faceless by the Disney machine, not that they were that way personally.

  • antikitschychick says:

    just finished watching the entire webcast via the medici site and I have to say, overall I really, really liked it. The music itself I thought was superb, better than Satyagraha (which for me is saying a lot since I loved Satyagraha) I thought and the production was very good too, at least on video it was very theatrical. The male principals were all very good, but I agree it sucks the female parts were marginalized… my biggest complaint though is that the chorus was indeed unintelligible from beginning to end and that detracted from the overall performance since there were a lot of choral pieces/recitatives and I had no idea what they fuck they were saying which was frustrating but, can ya do?

    Having said all that, I can totally see why it would be a problem getting this shown in America as Glass does not paint Disney in any positive light whatsoever, though I can also understand, given my own lack of knowledge or insight into Walt Disney “the man”, why Glass wanted to emphatically present the more flawed aspects of the character, as they do make for better theater: it is much more self-reflexive than many an Opera and I applaud him for that. Also, it gives the viewer/listener much to ponder about.