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Cher Public

  • stevey: Zinka! I have long wanted to ask you about someone, as I value and respect your thoughts and... 11:01 PM
  • ducadiposa: Nothing truer was ever said! Odd, as I just commented on another blog about much the same thing... 10:35 PM
  • Krunoslav: To ne Manz’s narration is as hard to endure as the long-running NYC radio commercial... 10:31 PM
  • DonCarloFanatic: On the other hand, experiencing opera the way prior generations might have, the more... 10:21 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: with sound httpvh://www.youtu be.com/watch?v=5Z9 kAJUTWUA 10:19 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Regular: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=MW78 ihWwwYg 10:16 PM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Wide screen test httpvh://www.youtu be.com/watch?v=PPu J3W-qUuc 10:15 PM
  • WindyCityOperaman: httpvh://www.youtu be.com/watch?v=_SA GJWTIXiQ 10:10 PM
  • m. croche: ” Productions reflect the zeitgeist, but times and tastes change (not always for the... 9:53 PM
  • Bluebeard: I absolutely agree. I’ve loved Hytner’s work before, including the first run of this... 9:50 PM

C’est la guerre, mais ce n’est pas magnifique

“If war is hell, then Soldier Songs should rank somewhere around ‘purgatory.’ David T. Little’s hourlong opera, which made its NYC debut Sunday, takes a serious and exciting idea—the experiences of ordinary soldiers before, during and after combat—and reduces it to a mishmash of verbal and musical clichés.” [New York Post]

2 comments

  • Henry Holland says:

    But neither text nor music has anything remotely interesting to communicate about the experience of war — not even “what is it good for?”

    Hahahaha, I’m sure the ghosts of Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong would approve of that sentence.

  • killthewabbit says:

    Glad to see you got this one squarely in the crosshairs. At least one of the other local critics seems to be too busy exchanging high fives with the composer and company on Facebook to issue sound judgement.