Headshot of La Cieca

Cher Public

  • m. croche: Overall, the orchestra sounded beautiful, if consistently rushed by right tempos that did not... 7:11 AM
  • manou: Libretto here: http://t.co/xEOlI1 hOoW 6:39 AM
  • tiger1: Thanks a lot, Jungfer. I am happy to say that now I have at least heard it. I did not listen... 6:30 AM
  • Dabrowski: Don’t give him any ideas. 4:41 AM
  • Dabrowski: Phyllis Chesler is a joke, one of those hacks that the far right likes to trot out as a convert to... 4:40 AM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: Viva Sheila Nadler! 2:54 AM
  • Quanto Painy Fakor: httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=Vc5e qmucGl4 httpv://www.youtub e.com/watch?v=8... 2:51 AM
  • SF Guy: Typo alert–I̵ 7;ve made no attempt to smooth out Anna’s charmingly fractured English,... 2:47 AM
  • mb: I suggest you re-check your dictionary. https://de.wikiped ia.org/wiki/Meiste rsinger &... 2:44 AM
  • La Cieca: What better place for a performance of gravitas than Boston? 2:38 AM

C’est la guerre, mais ce n’est pas magnifique

“If war is hell, then Soldier Songs should rank somewhere around ‘purgatory.’ David T. Little’s hourlong opera, which made its NYC debut Sunday, takes a serious and exciting idea—the experiences of ordinary soldiers before, during and after combat—and reduces it to a mishmash of verbal and musical clichés.” [New York Post]

2 comments

  • Henry Holland says:

    But neither text nor music has anything remotely interesting to communicate about the experience of war — not even “what is it good for?”

    Hahahaha, I’m sure the ghosts of Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong would approve of that sentence.

  • killthewabbit says:

    Glad to see you got this one squarely in the crosshairs. At least one of the other local critics seems to be too busy exchanging high fives with the composer and company on Facebook to issue sound judgement.