Cher Public

  • Satisfied: Thank you! NPW! Will check it out. 6:30 PM
  • armerjacquino: Lorenzo: understood and agreed, and apologies for misreading. As far as Verdi is concerned, the kind of nationalism... 6:28 PM
  • grimoaldo: The character eventually known as Beckmesser was called Veit Hanslich in the first draft of the libretto, which Wagner read... 6:26 PM
  • Poison Ivy: lorenzo, I think if Wagner attracted a lot of uh, attention from Nazis and is criticized but Verdi’s strain of Italian... 6:24 PM
  • lorenzo.venezia: Cicciabella, thank you, but I don’t as a rule write about these things, although I think about them and talk about... 5:29 PM
  • lorenzo.venezia: Armer, I agree with you entirely on Merchant of Venice (and The Jew of Malta which panders to the lowest common... 5:22 PM
  • lorenzo.venezia: Ivy, I agree there are undertones and overtones and I’m not arguing against that. My argument is against people who... 5:14 PM
  • NPW-Paris: (That was in reply to Satisfied, and I apologise for the mistakes). 5:13 PM

C’est la guerre, mais ce n’est pas magnifique

“If war is hell, then Soldier Songs should rank somewhere around ‘purgatory.’ David T. Little’s hourlong opera, which made its NYC debut Sunday, takes a serious and exciting idea—the experiences of ordinary soldiers before, during and after combat—and reduces it to a mishmash of verbal and musical clichés.” [New York Post]


  • Henry Holland says:

    But neither text nor music has anything remotely interesting to communicate about the experience of war — not even “what is it good for?”

    Hahahaha, I’m sure the ghosts of Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong would approve of that sentence.

  • killthewabbit says:

    Glad to see you got this one squarely in the crosshairs. At least one of the other local critics seems to be too busy exchanging high fives with the composer and company on Facebook to issue sound judgement.